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dc.contributor.advisorFeryok, Anne
dc.contributor.advisorSweetnam, Moyra
dc.contributor.advisorTaylor, John
dc.contributor.authorPryde, Michael
dc.date.available2013-06-20T04:43:02Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationPryde, M. (2013). Patterns in conversations between Japanese students and New Zealand homestay parents (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4086en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4086
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a descriptive, qualitative analysis that involves 17-18 year old Japanese students on a study abroad programme. The study begins by reviewing the literature on study abroad, particularly on homestays, which has indicated some of the challenges facing those involved in study abroad. It then examines cultural and social factors by considering Hall’s work on high-context and low-context cultures, Hofstede’s work on cultural dimensions, and Schumann’s work on social distance. The influence of cultural and social factors on language use is then explored within a framework that includes an analysis of conversational maxims and politeness principles, as well as the Japanese educational setting and Japanese psyche. Data was collected in the New Zealand homestay situations of 17 Japanese students, all from similar backgrounds, from May, 2007 to March, 2008. By combining various methodological approaches, conversations were specifically categorised into either major or minor communication issues and then coded for how particular sentences and words functioned. The influences of cultural and social factors were identified through features such as implicature, conversational rules (maxims), and politeness strategies (through direct and indirect face-threatening acts). One particular conversational style, termed the IRF (Initiation, Response, Follow-up) or triadic dialogue, commonly found in the EFL classroom, was discovered to be common in the homestay environment. Other findings showed that many students’ backchannel moves were misinterpreted by their hosts as agreement, that students rarely initiated conversations, that hosts often gave unsolicited corrective feedback and advice, and that hosts often dominated the conversations with their students. Other communication themes that emerged included the loss of students’ conversational turns, the failure of students to recognise phatic communion, misinterpretation of implicatures, and “negative” transfer of particular Japanese cultural characteristics. These findings are discussed in light of asymmetrical relationships and how English is taught in the Japanese/English classroom. Both these factors influenced and maintained the roles and rights of the interlocutors and contributed to a particular conversational style. This thesis illustrates that the social and cultural assumptions of both host parents and students influenced their relationships and furthermore reinforced stereotypes that further perpetuated a particular communicative style. In short, a vicious circle was initiated, which was difficult to escape from. This thesis concludes by suggesting that if communication issues are documented, and analysed, then action can be taken to attempt to improve homestay programme curriculums so that people can become more inter-culturally and cross-culturally aware of how they are communicating, which may contribute to producing more positive homestay experiences.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjecthomestayen_NZ
dc.subjectJapanese cultureen_NZ
dc.subjectcommunicationen_NZ
dc.subjectHofstedeen_NZ
dc.subjectSchumannen_NZ
dc.subjectGriceen_NZ
dc.subjectconversational styleen_NZ
dc.subjectpoliteness strategiesen_NZ
dc.subjecttriadic dialogueen_NZ
dc.subjectface-threateningen_NZ
dc.subjectasymmetricalen_NZ
dc.subjectJapanese/English classroomen_NZ
dc.subjectimplicatureen_NZ
dc.subjectmaximsen_NZ
dc.subjectcross-culturalen_NZ
dc.subjectinterculturalen_NZ
dc.subjectHallen_NZ
dc.subjectHallidayen_NZ
dc.subjectpositive politenessen_NZ
dc.subjectnegative politenessen_NZ
dc.subjectnemawashien_NZ
dc.subjectinitiationen_NZ
dc.subjectresponseen_NZ
dc.subjectfeedbacken_NZ
dc.subjectfollow upen_NZ
dc.subjectevaluativeen_NZ
dc.subjectminor communicationen_NZ
dc.subjectmajor communicationen_NZ
dc.titlePatterns in conversations between Japanese students and New Zealand homestay parentsen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-06-19T04:05:33Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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