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dc.contributor.advisorFleming, Jean
dc.contributor.authorMay, Adam Stephen Gary
dc.date.available2013-06-26T23:52:23Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationMay, A. S. G. (2013). In vitro meat: protein for twelve billion? (Thesis, Master of Science Communication). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4101en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4101
dc.description.abstractThis thesis provides the background for the creative component of this MSciComm – entitled ‘Meating Expectations’ - a 25 minute documentary produced with Rodney August. This documentary covered a novel method of meat production; in vitro meat production, meat grown from stem cells, independent of the animal. The documentary investigates how in vitro meat is made, why it is necessary, the problems that it could solve and the problems that it could create. The general aim of this thesis was to raise public awareness concerning an in vitro meat product. Conventional meat production is inefficient and unsustainable, severely diminishing freshwater quality and using prime agricultural land. It is the leading cause of loss of biodiversity, causes more greenhouse gases than the entire transportation sector and is undercutting international grain resources and staple food reserves. Today’s escalating population, combined with rising affluence and the resultant unparalleled rise in meat consumption, (particularly in developing countries), is causing severe damage to the environment. In vitro meat production is being researched mainly in the Netherlands and the USA. In vitro meat can be grown from embryonic stem cells or adult stem cells without harming an animal. Relative to conventional meat production, in vitro meat has the potential to be healthier, more efficient and more environmentally friendly, with less chance of disease and contamination. However, at present, the risk of contamination or error in the production of in vitro meat is at the same level as the risk of contamination or error at companies where conventional meat is processed, such as in the production of sausages, hamburgers, nuggets etc. However, challenges remain: there are problems with both the embryonic and adult stem cells, the very foundation of in vitro meat. Circulation restraints mean the growth of well-structured meats, like steaks, is not yet achievable. The optimal culture medium required to ‘feed’ the meat is yet to be ascertained. Presently, because of the small scale of production, culturing in vitro meat is very expensive. Research and technical advances are required to achieve commercial-scale production, but there is limited funding on offer. It may be a long time before a viable in vitro meat product is accessible. Some see social acceptance as the greatest impediment to an in vitro meat product. If an in vitro meat product is produced with all the features of meat, which tastes good, is shown to be safe and is cheap, people would most likely consume it. In vitro meat is almost here, it may provide a cheap protein source for developed and underdeveloped nations.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectin vitro meat
dc.subjectcultured meat
dc.subjectlab meat
dc.subjectfranken steak
dc.subjectmeat production
dc.subjectmeat grown from stem cells
dc.subjectConventional meat production
dc.subjectmeat consumption
dc.subjectsustainable meat
dc.subjecthumane meat
dc.subjectMeat without slaughter
dc.subjectvictimless meat
dc.subjectembryonic stem cells
dc.subjectadult stem cells
dc.subjectprotein
dc.subjectsomatic stem cells
dc.subjectDedifferentiation
dc.subjectdifferentiation
dc.subjectEntomophagy
dc.subjectFibroblasts
dc.subjectHypertrophy
dc.subjectin vivo
dc.subjectin vitro
dc.subjectMyoblast
dc.subjectmyofibre
dc.subjectmyofiber
dc.subjectmuscle fibre
dc.subjectmyofibril
dc.subjectmyotube
dc.subjectmyogenesis
dc.subjectMyogenic contraction
dc.subjectMyosatellite cells
dc.subjectquorn
dc.subjectSurimi
dc.subjecttempeh
dc.subjecttofu
dc.subjectTransdifferentiation
dc.subjectagriculture
dc.subjectpopulation growth
dc.subjectdiminishing natural resources
dc.subjectlimited land
dc.subjectdeclining grain stocks
dc.subjectrising meat demand
dc.subjectmalnourished people
dc.subjectrising affluence
dc.subjectbiofuels
dc.subjecthigher food prices
dc.subjectglobal food insecurity
dc.subjectmeat disadvantages
dc.subjecthistory of in vitro meat
dc.subjectmuscle development
dc.subjectproliferation
dc.subjectproliferative capacity
dc.subjecttissue restoration
dc.subjectskeletal muscle regeneration
dc.subjectskeletal muscle
dc.subjecttissue engineering
dc.subjectmuscle
dc.subjectengineering
dc.subjectculture media
dc.subjectbioreactors
dc.subjectground meat
dc.subjectprocessed meat
dc.subjectscaffold based techniques
dc.subjectscaffold
dc.subjectself organizing techniques
dc.subjectstructured meat
dc.subjectdisease
dc.subjectdisease control
dc.titleIn vitro meat: protein for twelve billion?
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-06-26T23:30:59Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineThe Centre for Science Communication
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science Communication
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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