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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Ian
dc.contributor.authorGeary Nichol, Rose Caroline
dc.date.available2013-10-28T19:51:13Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationGeary Nichol, R. C. (2013). ‘Wrought into being’: An archaeological examination of colonial ideology in Wellington, 1840-1865. (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4355en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4355
dc.description.abstractThe archaeology of urban environments in New Zealand is typically relegated to cultural heritage management investigation. This type of investigation is restricted by the limitations of the cultural heritage management framework, and urban archaeological investigation is often compelled by heritage regulation rather than academic inquiry. This has contributed to a limited archaeological understanding of an important period in New Zealand’s history – that of early colonial urbanism. Colonial urbanism is not often examined as a phenomenon in and of itself in New Zealand’s archaeological discipline, nor is archaeological theory applied to this context at a sustained and meaningful level. This thesis compiles existing archaeological and cartographic evidence from this period in a geographic information system project and examines its relationship with the ideologies that influenced New Zealand’s colonial settlers. Wellington was the first urban settlement established by the New Zealand Company in New Zealand in 1840. The Company and its settlers espoused an ideology strongly influenced by 19th century capitalism and British imperialism. This ideology was reified by colonial theorist Edward Gibbon Wakefield and emphasised a perception of land as material. In view of this emphasis, archaeology offers a particularly appropriate approach to an examination of the relationship between this ideology and the urban form created by the settlers. Using the settlement of Wellington as a case study, this thesis examines colonial urbanism through a unique theoretical framework constructed using archaeological, historical and urban planning perspectives. This framework facilitates an alternative understanding of the colonial urban environment by reinterpreting the city as a material artefact. The data compiled in this research displays how this artefact – the city – is a product of its colonial creators, and, in particular, the ideology that influenced these colonists. It identifies a causal relationship between the motivating ideology of the colonists and the form of the city artefact, highlighting the impact of ideology on the process of urban development.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectarchaeology
dc.subjecturbanism
dc.subjectcolonialism
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectWellington
dc.subjectideology
dc.subjectsystematic colonisation
dc.subjectcity artefact
dc.subjectmaterial culture
dc.subjectcultural landscape
dc.title‘Wrought into being’: An archaeological examination of colonial ideology in Wellington, 1840-1865.
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-10-26T13:30:16Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropolgy and Archaeology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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