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dc.contributor.advisorClements, Kevin
dc.contributor.advisorWarbrick, Paerau
dc.contributor.authorParker, Anna Rachael
dc.date.available2013-11-17T20:10:02Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationParker, A. R. (2013). Generative Tensions: Meaning making in a social movement (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4437en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4437
dc.description.abstractDuring the 1980s — responding to indigenous Māori demands for self determination and redress for 150 years of violent colonisation — a dominant group (Pākehā) anti-racism movement adopted the Treaty of Waitangi as a framework to address issues of dominant cultural hegemony in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Consulting with Māori groups, this social movement (described as the Pākehā Treaty movement) developed a methodology of “co-intentional” relationships. This practice saw Māori and Pākehā groups working with their own people separately to progress a decolonisation agenda. During the early 2000s, a “third generation” of activists with a commitment to decolonisation sought a place in this Pākehā Treaty movement. This third generation brought with them questions of identity and practice as they worked to negotiate their own cross-cultural relationships in a Pākeha space. From a position as “insider” in this social movement, I draw upon the social constructionist influence on social movement studies, positioning meaning making as a “knowledge-practice” central to the work of social movements. In this qualitative study, I use narrative inquiry to explore the stories of third-generation participants for the meanings they construct about their Treaty/decolonisation work. The meanings participants construct are examined in dialogue ¬-with movement discourse, where there is both convergence and tension. By focusing on meaning making in the cross-cultural group experience, this research identifies that third-generation decolonisation practices flow from, and are critical to, the formation of socially just relationships. Out of the decentering encounters of socially just relationships, third-generation participants open up the fixed meanings of “others”, of identity, of power and language and the ways in which these “singularities” do not serve a decolonisation agenda. From my reading of activist narratives, I argue that socially just relationships allow for agonistic dialogue, where tension in meaning can be generative, where differences and challenges produced intergenerationally and intersubjectively can produce “new ways of being”. This study contributes and speaks to several audiences: to the development of relationships in the Pakeha Treaty movement, to the cultural turn in Social Movement Studies, and to the re-imagining of methodologies in Peace and Conflict Studies.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectsocial movements
dc.subjectTe Tiriti o Waitangi
dc.subjectdecolonisation
dc.subjectsocially just relationships
dc.subjectTreaty of Waitangi
dc.subjectPakeha Treaty movement
dc.titleGenerative Tensions: Meaning making in a social movement
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-11-16T05:53:24Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineNational Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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