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dc.contributor.advisorMcLellan, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorCaldwell, Felicity Jane
dc.date.available2013-11-21T20:24:04Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationCaldwell, F. J. (2013). The Therapeutic Role of NK Cells in DC Immunotherapy (Thesis, Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences with Honours). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4486en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4486
dc.description.abstractDendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy is a promising treatment for cancer. Despite now being used in the clinic, the role and mechanisms of lymphocyte subsets stimulated by DC immunotherapy are not completely understood. Potential mechanisms for anti-tumour responses include cytokine (e.g. interferon-gamma; IFN-γ) or direct cell-killing mechanisms (e.g. perforin) performed by natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells or CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. This current study used a B16/OVA-melanoma tumour model with bacteria-stimulated dendritic cells, coupled with antibody-mediated depletions (NK cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and IFN-γ) and mice genetically deficient in IFN-γ and perforin to determine the mechanism of successful DC immunotherapy. In agreement with previous work, CD4+ T cell, CD8+ T cell and NK cell depletion resulted in a loss in efficacy of DC immunotherapy, although in this study, this effect failed to reach statistical significance for all lymphocytes. We found that DC immunotherapy induced an IFN-γ, not perforin, mediated anti-tumour response against B16/OVA melanoma tumour. Determining the role and mechanism of killing tumour cells in DC immunotherapy is of great importance and could lead to improvements in DC immunotherapy strategies. Showing particular promise is optimisation of IFN-γ release to enhance a potent anti-tumour response.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNatural-Killer-Cell
dc.subjectDendritic-Cell-Immunotherapy
dc.subjectMelanoma
dc.subjectStreptococcus-salivarius-K12
dc.subjectMurine
dc.subjectInterferon-gamma
dc.subjectPerforin
dc.titleThe Therapeutic Role of NK Cells in DC Immunotherapy
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-11-21T08:22:06Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunology
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Biomedical Sciences with Honours
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelHonours
otago.openaccessOpen
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