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dc.contributor.advisorStephenson, Janet
dc.contributor.advisorBryant-Tokalau, Jenny
dc.contributor.authorMcCrossin, Nicole
dc.date.available2014-01-05T22:32:02Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.citationMcCrossin, N. (2013). Intention and Implementation: Piecing Together Provisions for Māori in the Resource Management Act 1991 (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4547en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4547
dc.description.abstractToday, it is widely recognised that indigenous people have a valuable contribution to make to the development and practice of resource management. New Zealand legislation recognises in part the importance of Māori participation in resource management; however, there appears to be a considerable gap between the recognition of these rights and their effective and widespread implementation at ground level. This study explores the intentions behind, and the implementation of Section 33 transfers of power and Sections 36B-E joint management agreements, under the Resource Management Act, which support Māori participation in resource management decision-making. These provide for the devolution of power from local authorities to iwi authorities and the establishment of agreements to co-manage resources with iwi. A nationwide survey of local authorities’ use of the provisions demonstrated that they had been virtually unused. The majority of local authorities do not have any form of co-management agreements with Māori, and those that do have quite constrained arrangements which are designed to enhance consultation, rather than shared decision-making. The results of the survey are contrasted to findings from a series of semi-structured interviews with key informants involved in the crafting of the RMA, which examines the intentions behind the inclusion of these mechanisms in the legislation. The concept of institutional bricolage is used to help explain their creation and implementation, and the subsequent negotiation of the mechanisms and their alternatives by councils. The survey and interview results revealed that an intentional institutional bricolage approach was frequently employed by councils and iwi to negotiate co-management arrangements, but was not used in the crafting of the RMA co-management provisions. Instead, the provisions were a result of unintentional institutional bricolage, drawing on a range of structural and social influences.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectRMA
dc.subjectMaori
dc.subjectco-management
dc.subjectjoint management
dc.subjecttransfers of power
dc.subjectResource Management Act 1991
dc.subjectiwi
dc.subjectresource management
dc.subjectjoint management agreements
dc.subjectinstitutional bricolage
dc.subjectlocal government
dc.titleIntention and Implementation: Piecing Together Provisions for Māori in the Resource Management Act 1991
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2013-12-23T23:55:34Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineTe Tumu
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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