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dc.contributor.advisorSkidmore, Paula
dc.contributor.advisorGearry, Richard
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Robin Lee
dc.date.available2014-03-14T01:03:07Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationSpencer, R. L. (2014). Relationship between fructose and lactose intakes and irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a sample of 50-year old Cantabrians. (Thesis, Master of Dietetics). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4666en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4666
dc.description.abstractBackground: One therapeutic strategy to alleviate irritable bowel syndrome [IBS] symptoms may be to reduce the intake of dietary fructose and lactose. The majority of patients with IBS believe that diet contributes to their symptoms. They may limit their intake of certain food groups or specific foods that are vital in the diet to provide essential nutrients in attempt to self-manage their symptoms. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the relationship between fructose and lactose consumption and IBS symptoms in 50-year old adults residing in Canterbury. Methods: The Canterbury Health Ageing and Life Course [CHALICE] study is a longitudinal study consisting of 50-year old (n = 300) Cantabrians. Participants attended a 4 – 6 hour assessment and underwent multiple interviews and procedures. Data used in this thesis include the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire and a four-day estimated food and beverage diary [FBD]. Participants who reported any IBS symptoms were categorised into the IBS symptom group and those who reported no symptoms were categorised into the no symptoms group. Using the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire, individual participant scores for constipation, diarrhoea, pain score, and total symptom score were calculated. FBD data were converted to nutrients using the food and nutrient analysis programme; Kai-culator. Results: Two hundred and twenty seven (75.7%) participants completed the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire and a four-day estimated FBD and were included in the analyses. The IBS dimensions constipation, diarrhoea, and total IBS score were not associated with fructose or lactose intake. A lower prevalence of IBS pain symptoms was associated with higher mean daily intakes of fructose (P = 0.055) and lactose (P = 0.041). Conclusions: The findings suggest that participants with IBS symptoms may have reduced their intake of fructose and lactose. People with IBS could benefit from guidance from a Dietitian to achieve a well balanced diet while excluding foods they have identified that contribute to their particular IBS symptoms.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectIrritable
dc.subjectbowel
dc.subjectsyndrome
dc.subjectIBS
dc.subjectFODMAPs
dc.subjectfructose
dc.subjectlactose
dc.subjectCHALICE
dc.subjectCanterbury
dc.subjectsymptoms
dc.titleRelationship between fructose and lactose intakes and irritable bowel syndrome symptoms in a sample of 50-year old Cantabrians.
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-03-13T21:29:21Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Human Nutrition
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Dietetics
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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