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dc.contributor.advisorBallantyne, Tony
dc.contributor.advisorStenhouse, John
dc.contributor.advisorKerin, Rani
dc.contributor.advisorShogimen, Takashi
dc.contributor.advisorWard, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorBateman, Grace
dc.date.available2014-04-03T20:07:43Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationBateman, G. (2014). Signs and Graces: Remembering Religion in Childhood in Southern Dunedin, 1920-1950 (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4752en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4752
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the meanings of everyday experiences of religion for children in southern Dunedin, in the period 1920-1950. As such, it joins the growing array of voices calling for greater investigation of religion in New Zealand’s past, particularly in the influential and significant period of childhood. In keeping with international trends, it looks not only at official institutional religion, but takes a broad view towards ‘lived religion’ through evidence relating to everyday life and popular culture. This research draws on extensive original oral history interviews as a key methodology to explore attitudes, emotions and beliefs from the ‘bottom up’. This shifts the focus from the formal outward signs of official religion to understanding the nature and significance of inward spiritual graces. This study is organised into five sections, which cover the different cultural ‘worlds’ in which children lived religion in southern Dunedin. By taking an explicitly interdisciplinary approach, it draws together different threads to make connections not previously made in histories of New Zealand, in particular between religion, music, literature, prayer, death, and childhood. The everyday spaces in which children ‘lived’ religion in southern Dunedin span both ‘public’ and ‘private’, and ‘sacred’ and ‘secular’ places, including at home, school, clubs, civic events, cemeteries, concert halls and streets. Throughout, this study shows how children exerted their own individual agency and choice regarding their religious experiences, and the meanings thereof. This research demonstrates that for many children in southern Dunedin in the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s, cultural Christianity was a significant part of the fabric of everyday life, contributing to the formation of these children’s sense of identity as they grew up, and continuing to influence their lives in diverse and complicated ways through their adult years.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectoral history
dc.subjectreligious history
dc.subjectreligion
dc.subjectchildhood
dc.subjectchildren
dc.subjectchild
dc.subjectNew Zealand history
dc.subjectSouth Dunedin
dc.subjectSouthern Dunedin
dc.subjectmemories
dc.subjectmemory
dc.subjectDunedin
dc.subjectChristianity
dc.subjectChristian
dc.subjectcultural Christianity
dc.subjectgolden-rule
dc.subjectcultural history
dc.subjectsocial history
dc.subjectmusic
dc.subjectreading
dc.subjectliterature
dc.subjectchildren's literature
dc.subjectchildren's reading
dc.subjectdeath
dc.subjectprayer
dc.subjectpray
dc.subjectchildren's agency
dc.subjectchildren's perceptions of death
dc.subjectsinging
dc.subjectlived religion
dc.subjectpopular culture
dc.subjecteveryday life
dc.subjectofficial religion
dc.subjectpopular religion
dc.subjectinterviews
dc.subjectbottom-up
dc.subjectbottom-up history
dc.subjectinterdisciplinary history
dc.subjectinterdisciplinarity
dc.subjectformal outward signs
dc.subjectinward spiritual graces
dc.subjectSunday school
dc.subjectchurch
dc.subjectOtago
dc.titleSigns and Graces: Remembering Religion in Childhood in Southern Dunedin, 1920-1950
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-04-03T02:06:39Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory and Art History
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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