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dc.contributor.advisorSandretto, Susan
dc.contributor.authorLawson, Wendy
dc.date.available2014-04-06T20:55:59Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationLawson, W. (2014). Does that sound right? An Investigation into Communication and Information Sharing Between Classroom Teachers and Reading Recovery Teachers (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4756en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4756
dc.description.abstractThis project aims to provide contextual insights, through interpretation data, into the depth of information sharing, and quality of professional conversations between teachers who work with the same students. The participants are Reading Recovery teachers and classroom teachers of students currently on the Reading Recovery programme, as this construct illustrates a clear example of two education professionals being involved in tutoring the same students. This small scale research project, underpinned by sociocultural theory, is situated in two New Zealand mainstream primary schools, with three teachers from each school taking part in the study. The six participants were interviewed individually, and then participated in a group interview with the other participants from their school. National and international literature regarding professional conversations focuses on the positive impact such conversations can have on student achievement. It offers insights into possible methods of integrating professional conversations into school culture. Centred on Reading Recovery teachers and the classroom teachers of students currently on the Reading Recovery programme, this study explores the content of conversations focused on increasing the literacy acquisition of their shared students. The findings indicate that professional conversations are under-utilised, with classroom teachers and Reading Recovery teachers operating as individuals rather than developing a collaborative approach. This discovery led to an exploration of why this was so, reflecting on teacher beliefs, espoused theories and theories-in-use. The participants’ own assessments of the level and content of their conversations are examined, and perceived barriers/enablers to professional conversations are explored. As a Resource Teacher: Literacy, I too work with classroom teachers to increase the literacy acquisition of identified students. Indeed, the relationship between Reading Recovery teachers and classroom teachers is evocative of many school situations where more than one education professional is involved in the learning and/or behaviour of identified students. This study explores ways of increasing the effectiveness of professional conversation between education professionals. It has a broad application and the implications of the findings for school leaders and the wider education community are outlined. Possible areas for further research are also provided.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectteacher collegiality
dc.subjectlearning communities
dc.subjectliteracy
dc.subjectTeacher communication
dc.subjectprofessional conversations
dc.subjectteachers sharing information
dc.titleDoes that sound right? An Investigation into Communication and Information Sharing Between Classroom Teachers and Reading Recovery Teachers
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-04-04T07:40:46Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineEducation
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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