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dc.contributor.advisorDevere, Heather
dc.contributor.advisorClements, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorFurnari, Ellen
dc.date.available2014-04-07T21:46:54Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationFurnari, E. (2014). Understanding effectiveness in peacekeeping operations: Exploring the perspectives of frontline peacekeepers (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4765en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4765
dc.description.abstractThis project explores the experiences of frontline peacekeepers in order to understand a ground level view of effective peacekeeping. This thesis is influenced by critical peace studies and uses constructivist grounded theory as research theory and method. The research leads to modest theorising based on what those interviewed perceived as crucial elements of effective peacekeeping and how these insights might contribute to improving or re-visioning peacekeeping. Thus I include both problematizing and problem-solving in what is, I believe, a productive tension. In this thesis peacekeeping refers to organised action by third parties to prevent violence, protect civilians, and support local problem-solving by controlling or influencing belligerents and/or their proxies as well as local people, a definition constructed from this research and the literature. In existing research on peacekeeping, the opinions of frontline peacekeeping soldiers, police and civilians have rarely been considered in analysis of the effectiveness of a mission nor when theorising how peacekeeping works. My research reflects an assumption that there are differences in how effective peacekeeping is understood from the different perspectives and standpoints of elite or high level peacekeepers and academics who study peacekeeping and those of frontline peacekeepers. I assume there is value and important knowledge in the experience and perspectives of ground level peacekeepers which can contribute to the discussion of effective peacekeeping generally and a more emancipatory peacekeeping specifically. Utilising the above definition of peacekeeping, themes addressed here include how peacekeeping works on the ground to prevent violence, protect people and support local problem-solving through coercive and cooperative practices, with a particular focus on the importance of acceptance, local ownership and good relationships. In the eyes of peacekeepers, good relationships that are task oriented, cooperative and trusting are critical in peacekeeping. This thesis reflects my valuing nonviolent paths for addressing social and political conflicts, and my intention to make a contribution to more effective peacekeeping, oriented to increasing peace in conflict affected communities and countries.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectPeacekeeping
dc.subjectPeacekeepers
dc.subjecteffective peacekeeping
dc.subjectfrontline peacekeepers
dc.subjectconstructed grounded theory
dc.subjectrelationship
dc.subjectlocal ownership
dc.subjectacceptance
dc.titleUnderstanding effectiveness in peacekeeping operations: Exploring the perspectives of frontline peacekeepers
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-04-07T03:15:29Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePeace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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