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dc.contributor.advisorClements, Kevin
dc.contributor.authorQuinger, Leilana
dc.date.available2014-07-03T20:46:25Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationQuinger, L. (2014). How is the concept of hybridity useful in thinking about third party humanitarian interventions? Case Studies: Bougainville and Solomon Islands (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4889en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4889
dc.description.abstractHow one should carry out state-building humanitarian interventions responsibly and with positive outcomes has been called one of the primary problems of international relations today (Fry and Kabutaulaka 2008, 2-3). In the Pacific region, this is further complicated by recent colonial history, extreme power differences between states and increasing regionalism. The aim of my study is to assess two peace-building interventions, one in Bougainville and one in the Solomon Islands, in terms of their ability to build stable governance and lasting peace. To do this, I will be looking through the lens of hybridity - a term recently popularised in peace studies literature (Clements et al 2007; Mac Ginty 2011; Richmond 2009 & 2010). Using 'hybrid-sensitivity' as a way of assessing interventions could be a way forward in terms of assessing how foreign interventions can deal with the problems associated with national sovereignty, post- and/ or neo-colonialism and our responsibility to protect others elsewhere - and to secure security within the region.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectBougainville
dc.subjectSolomon Islands
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectIntervention
dc.titleHow is the concept of hybridity useful in thinking about third party humanitarian interventions? Case Studies: Bougainville and Solomon Islands
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-07-03T08:03:51Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePeace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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