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dc.contributor.advisorJackson, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorSvensson, Isak
dc.contributor.advisorStandish, Katerina
dc.contributor.authorBhattarai, Prakash
dc.date.available2014-09-07T23:12:55Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationBhattarai, P. (2014). Third-Party Coordination in Conflict Resolution: Views from Third-Party Practitioners in the Maoist Armed Conflict of Nepal and the Moro Conflict of the Philippines (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/4967en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/4967
dc.description.abstractA growing field within mediation research explores issues of multiparty intervention and third-party coordination. The existing literature highlights third-party coordination as a problematic but extremely important conflict intervention strategy; however, it lacks an in-depth understanding of fundamental aspects of third-party coordination. In the light of this research gap, this study explores three fundamental themes related to third-party coordination in conflict resolution: conditions for third-party coordination; the influence of relationship dynamics and power status of third parties on coordination; and the effectiveness of third-party coordination. These themes are elaborated by means of an analysis of two case studies: the Maoist armed conflict of Nepal and the Moro conflict of the Philippines. The research finds that third-party coordination is a contingent process, with varying needs and relevance in different phases and types of conflict. Context, policy and motive are three key factors influencing third parties’ readiness to coordinate. Power differences among third parties, their attitudes towards each other, differences in intervention strategies and priorities, the nature of conflicts, and the actions taken by the conflicting parties are five contextual factors that influence the dynamics of third-party relationships. Shared intervention goals and a convergence of interests among local and external third parties contribute to conflict resolution both during the conflict and in the political normalisation phase. Formalised intervention mechanisms mandated by the conflicting parties are found to be more strongly correlated with conflict resolution than informal and independent third-party interventions.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectthird-party
dc.subjectmediation
dc.subjectintervention
dc.subjectcoordination
dc.subjectNepal
dc.subjectPhilippines
dc.subjectconflict-resolution
dc.subjectarmed-conflict
dc.subjectpeace-process
dc.titleThird-Party Coordination in Conflict Resolution: Views from Third-Party Practitioners in the Maoist Armed Conflict of Nepal and the Moro Conflict of the Philippines
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-09-07T08:22:54Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineNational Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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