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dc.contributor.advisorCruz Banks, Ojeya
dc.contributor.authorMarler, Miriam Claire McEwan
dc.date.available2014-11-03T02:50:57Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationMarler, M. C. M. (2014). (Re) Conceptualising Dance: Moving towards embodying environment from Japan to Aotearoa (Thesis, Master of Dance Studies). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5100en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5100
dc.description.abstractThis study is about the relationship between body, landscape, and dance through the researcher’s experiences of learning a Japanese movement approach known as Body Weather (BW) in rural Japan in 2007, and her current dance practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ). To explore this topic, diverse viewpoints concerned with rethinking our notions of dance technique and training are reviewed (Bales & Nettl-Fiol, 2008; Browning, 2010). The cultural and somatic understandings of the Japanese dance practice and philosophy butoh (Crump, 2006; Fraleigh, 2010; Hamera, 1990; Stein, 2001), and its offspring Body Weather (Grant & de Quincey, 2006; Orr & Sweeney, 2011; Snow, 2006; Taylor, 2010) provide a lens expanding the notion of dance. Body Weather relevance within the Aotearoa context is also highlighted. How Māori notions of ecology (Marsden, 2003; Mead, 2003; Royal, 2007, 2009) might inform or share conversation with Body Weather practice in Aotearoa is analysed. Approaches of dance ethnography and practice-based research are blended to unearth somatic and cultural knowledge from Body Weather experiences in Japan and Aotearoa in response to the research question: What cultural and philosophical perspectives were gained through dance experiences on Min Tanaka’s Body Weather farm? And the guiding sub questions: a) what conceptualisation did I, the researcher, bring to the experience? b) How does knowledge from the experience in Japan inform current practice in Ōtepoti/Dunedin? The thesis argues that Body Weather is a somatic, ecological movement practice that is rooted in Japanese notions of body and spirituality, and offers insight into the ways in which it can successfully transplant in Aotearoa. The study aims to stimulate a critical somatic perspective that expands our definitions of dance.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectDance Studies
dc.subjectSomatic Practice
dc.subjectBody Weather
dc.subjectAotearoa
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectJapan
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectButoh
dc.subjectMin Tanaka
dc.subjectDance Ethnography
dc.subjectDance Ecology
dc.title(Re) Conceptualising Dance: Moving towards embodying environment from Japan to Aotearoa
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-11-03T00:24:12Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Dance Studies
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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