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dc.contributor.authorBoyes, Suzanneen_NZ
dc.date.available2014-11-10T20:16:35Z
dc.date.copyright2006-10en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBoyes, S. (2006, October). Mai i ngā Ao e Rua – From Two Worlds : An investigation into the attitudes towards half castes in New Zealand (Dissertation, Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Māori Studies). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5154en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5154
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates the attitudes of others’ experienced by ‘half-caste’ or bi-ethnic people of New Zealand, that is, people who have both Māori and Pākehā heritage. The dissertation combines the personal narratives of four half-caste people, my own story, and historical/theoretical literature to illuminate this subject. The dissertation introduces the topic by firstly, discussing the current identity politics in New Zealand, which has tended to dominate the political landscape as of late, and left half-caste people between the crossfire. Secondly, I introduce part of my own story as a half-caste person in New Zealand. In Chapter one, the pre-colonial origins of attitudes towards race, intermarriage and miscegenation are examined through an analysis of religious and scientific discourses. Chapter Two provides a basic understanding of Māori and Pākehā identity as separate entities, with the aim of demonstrating the binary opposites that have informed attitudes towards half-castes in New Zealand. The third chapter outlines a number of themes regarding attitudes towards the half caste people I interviewed as part of this research. The final chapter brings together literature and interview material through the lens of a Bill of Rights for Racially Mixed People to provide an approach for looking towards the future of half-caste identity politics.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectethnicityen_NZ
dc.subjectidentityen_NZ
dc.subjecthalf-casteen_NZ
dc.subjectraceen_NZ
dc.subjectmixed-raceen_NZ
dc.subjectmixed raceen_NZ
dc.subjectidentity politicsen_NZ
dc.subjecthalf casteen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHT Communities. Classes. Racesen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshDU Oceania (South Seas)en_NZ
dc.titleMai i ngā Ao e Rua – From Two Worlds : An investigation into the attitudes towards half castes in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages91en_NZ
otago.date.accession2007-09-05en_NZ
otago.schoolTe Tumu, School of Māori, Pacific & Indigenous Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineTe Tumu, School of Māori, Pacific & Indigenous Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Arts with Honours in Māori Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelHonours Dissertationsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.identifier.eprintste-tumu51en_NZ
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