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dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Nathanen_NZ
dc.date.available2014-11-10T20:16:38Z
dc.date.copyright2004-12en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMatthews, N. (2004). The physicality of Māori message transmission - Ko te tinana, he waka tuku kōrero. Junctures: The Journal for Thematic Dialogue, (3: Body), 9–18.en
dc.identifier.issn1179-8912en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5157
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the transmission of meaning via the body in the Māori performing arts through the medium of haka (Māori posture dances). Both the physical and spiritual aspects of Māori performance will be explored to determine the ideals of effective performance within the Māori world. Haka is an art form with various classes and subclasses; and this article describes these classes and subclasses in relation to their function and physical form. This analysis will highlight the ability and potency of haka to transmit social and political messages. Moreover, I will examine the specific bodily actions and movements associated with Māori performance with regard to the way in which it is used to emphasise, physically articulate and consequently enhance the verbal performance and overall transmission of meaning. Performing arts fulfilled a wide variety of social and political functions in traditional Māori society. These functions included welcoming guests (haka pōwhiri – haka of welcome), fare-welling and mourning the deceased (waiata tangi laments), attracting a mate (waiata whaiāipo – “sweetheart songs”), giving advice or instructions (waiata tohutohu – message bearing songs), restoring self-respect (pātere – fast chants), intimidating an adversary (peruperu – war dance) and the transmission and making public of social and political messages (haka taparahi, ngeri – ceremonial haka). Regardless of function, the key aspect in Māori performing arts was the words and the message they contained. However, it was the body that was the instrument and vessel of delivery. The haka, as one form of performing art, is a posture dance accompanied by chanted or shouted song. Haka are often performed by groups of men, and increasingly today by groups of men and women. One of the main characteristics of haka are that actions involving all parts of the body are used to emphasise the words.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.relation.ispartofJunctures: The Journal for Thematic Dialogueen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.junctures.orgen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori performing artsen_NZ
dc.subjecthakaen_NZ
dc.subjectclassifications of hakaen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori languageen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshDU Oceania (South Seas)en_NZ
dc.titleThe physicality of Māori message transmission - Ko te tinana, he waka tuku kōreroen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.date.accession2006-05-10en_NZ
otago.relation.issue3: Bodyen_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage18en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage9en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.identifier.eprintste-tumu12en_NZ
dc.description.refereedTRUEen_NZ
dc.description.references1 T Kruger, “The Qualities of Ihi, Wehi and Wana” in Mead HM, Nga Tikanga Tuku Iho a te Māori, Customary Concepts of the Māori (Wellington, Victoria University of Wellington, 1984), 230. 4 A Awatere, “Review of Māori Poetry: The Singing Word by Barry Mitcalf”. The Journal of the Polynesian Society, Vol 84 (December 1975), 513. 8 T Kāretu, Nga Haka me nga Waiata (Hamilton: University of Waikato, 1978), 58. 10 T Kāretu, Haka: The Dance of a Noble People (Auckland: Reed Books, 1993), 41. 14 H Williams, Dictionary of the Māori Language (Wellington: GP Publications, 1992), 290. 16 Oral Source Pou Temara of Tūhoe. 19 A Armstrong, Māori Games and Hakas (Wellington: Reed Books, 1964), 119. 21 W Milroy in J Moorfield, Te Kōhure (Hamilton: University of Waikato, 1996), 39. 18 Matthews – Physicality of Māori Message – Junctures,3, Dec 2004 26 Oral Source Pakake Winiata of Ngāti Raukawa. 32 E Best, Tūhoe: The Children of the Mist (Auckland: Reed Books, 1996), 118. 36 E Tregear, Māori–Polynesian Comparative Dictionary (Christchurch: Whitcombe and Tombs, 1891), 332. 44 T Kāretu in J Moorfield, Te Kōhure (Hamilton: University of Waikato, 1996), 69.en_NZ
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