Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorReilly, Michael PJen_NZ
dc.date.available2014-11-10T20:16:39Z
dc.date.copyright2008en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationReilly, M. P. (2008). What is Māori Studies? University of Otago.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5159
dc.descriptionThis lecture was presented on 17 March 2008 by Professor Michael Reilly as part of the Humanities Open Lecture for candidates applying for the Chair position in Māori Studies at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractSid Mead once described Māori Studies as ‘the uncomfortable science’. Uncomfortable because its place within the university was often questioned by Pākehā scholars, while those who worked within the subject remained uneasy about their own position within the western university system (Mead 1997:32). This uncomfortable tone has not yet disappeared. For example, at the Māori Studies Subject Conference held at Waikato University in 2007 some participants openly questioned whether the subject had any future. Such existential anxiety indicates to me that asking the question, What is Māori Studies?, in 2008 is still a useful exercise, especially for those of us working here at the University of Otago. In the following lecture I will highlight important themes and events found in the history of our subject within New Zealand’s universities, including the University of Otago. I will conclude with some observations about what Māori Studies might stand for now and in the future, especially at this institution.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori languageen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori cultureen_NZ
dc.subjectMatauranga Maorien_NZ
dc.subjectIndigenous Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectPacific Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectNative Studiesen_NZ
dc.subjectMaori in the western universityen_NZ
dc.subjectTe Tumuen_NZ
dc.subjectMaorien_NZ
dc.subject.lcshGN Anthropologyen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshDU Oceania (South Seas)en_NZ
dc.titleWhat is Māori Studies?en_NZ
dc.typeSeminar, Speech or Other Presentationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.date.accession2008-06-12en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.identifier.eprintste-tumu56en_NZ
dc.description.referencesDewes, Te Kapunga, 1975. The Case for Oral Arts. In Michael King (ed.), Te Ao Hurihuri: the world moves on: aspects of Maoritanga. Wellington: Hicks Smith, pp. 55-85. Hanson, F. Allan and Louise Hanson, 1983. Counterpoint in Maori culture. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul. Marsden, Māori, 2003. Mātauranga Māori, mātauranga Pākehā. In Te Ahukaramū Charles Royal (ed.), The Woven Universe: selected writings of Rev. Māori Marsden. N.p.: the Estate of Rev. Māori Marsden, pp. 73-79. Mead, Sidney Moko, 1997. Maori Studies Tomorrow: Te Wananga i te Matauranga Maori. In Sidney Moko Mead (ed.), Landmarks, Bridges and Visions: Aspects of Maori culture. Wellington: Victoria University Press, pp. 21-38. Ngata, Apirana, 2004. Introduction. In Apirana Ngata (coll.), Ngā Mōteatea: he maramara rere nō ngā Waka Maha. Auckland: Auckland University Press / The Polynesian Society, pp. xxxiii-xxxviii. Said, Edward, 1988. Foreword. In Ranajit Guha and Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak (eds.), Selected Subaltern Studies. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. v-xii. Walker, Ranginui, 1996. Education and Power. In Ranginui Walker (ed.), Ngā Pepa a Ranginui: the Walker papers. Auckland: Penguin Books, pp. 161-69. Webster, Steven, 1998. Patrons of Maori Culture: Power, theory and ideology in the Maori Renaissance. Dunedin: University of Otago Press.en_NZ
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record