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dc.contributor.authorMules, Rangimarieen_NZ
dc.date.available2014-11-10T20:16:40Z
dc.date.copyright2007-10en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationMules, R. (2007, October). Kā Uri ā Papatūānuku: An investigation of pre-contact resource management in Te Wāi Pounamu (Dissertation, Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Māori Studies and Anthropology). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5161en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5161
dc.description.abstractIs the common perception that all indigenous peoples are innately harmonious a true depiction of reality? This research project aims to diffuse this theory. Its prime focus is to explore this notion of conservation in relation to southern Māori, and how, or if, such norms did indeed evolve within pre-contact southern Māori society. Upon arrival into the less biddable environment of Te Wāi Pounamu life proved to be very difficult for these Polynesian voyagers. Te Wāi Pounamu, a land beyond the reaches of tropical Polynesia, gave a whole new meaning to adaptation. Initial settlement was by no means an easy task, however with persistence, cultural divergence transpired. What once were Polynesian voyagers, at home on the ocean, became a uniquely shaped people in accordance to the environmental circumstance of Te Wāi Pounamu. Cultural concepts derived from Polynesia were adapted to give explanation to the new phenomena of Te Wāi Pounamu. Through implementation of such belief systems into everyday life, southern Māori developed a balance between human and their environment. The central aim of this dissertation is to explore the past in order to give meaning to the future. It examines how southern Māori may have adapted their physical, spiritual and cognitive development to suit the environment in which they dwelt, consequently suggesting that the land influenced humans more than humans may have influenced the land.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectMāorien_NZ
dc.subjectNgai Tahuen_NZ
dc.subjectNgāi Tahuen_NZ
dc.subjectSouth Islanden_NZ
dc.subjectTe Wai Pounamuen_NZ
dc.subjectConservationen_NZ
dc.subjectTraditional Ecological Knowledgeen_NZ
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectRangimarie Mules Environment New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subject.lcshGN Anthropologyen_NZ
dc.titleKā Uri ā Papatūānuku: An investigation of pre-contact resource management in Te Wāi Pounamuen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages88en_NZ
otago.date.accession2009-03-04en_NZ
otago.schoolTe Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, Department of Anthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineTe Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies, Department of Anthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Arts with Honours in Māori Studies and Anthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelHonours Dissertationsen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.identifier.eprintste-tumu59en_NZ
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A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in anthropology. University of Auckland, New Zealand. Williams, J. 2004. E pākihi hakinga a kai: an examination of pre-contact resource management practice in Southern Te Wāi Pounamu. A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the University of Otago (Te Whare Wānanga o Otāgo). Dunedin, New Zealand. Newspaper “God is revealed in the legends of the land”. Graeme Ferguson. The New Zealand Herald. 21 November 2002, pp A17. Maps Map 1 Map of Te Wāi Pounamu indicating locations mentioned in the text including an insert of Otago. Rangimarie Mules September 2007. Figures Title Page Hikaroroa, Karitane, Otago. Rangimarie Mules, September 2007. Fig. 0.1 Levels of analysis in traditional knowledge and management systems. Source: Berkes, F. 1999. Sacred ecology: traditional ecological knowledge and resource management. Philadelphia, America: Taylor & Francis. pp. 13. Fig. 1.1 Material evidence of Lapita migations. The University of Auckland Library in Alexandra Turnbull Library. Rerefence number: 5957. Part of: Anthropology Photograph Archive Fig. 1.2 Tongan sailing canoe, drawn by J. Webber on Captain Cook’s third voyage. Source: Davidson in Wilson (ed.) 1987. From the beginning: the archaeology of the Maori. Auckland, New Zealand: Penguin Books in association with the New Zealand Historic Places Trust, pp. 35 Fig. 1.3 Puketapu, Palmerston, Otago. Source: Rangimarie Mules, September 2007. Fig. 1.4 Skeleton of moa. Source: Alexandra Turnbull Library. Reference number: A-018-004. Part of: Drawings and Prints Collection. A-018-004. Fig. 1.5 Aotearoa forest cover in AD 1000 and AD 1840. Source: Trotter & McGulloch, 1989. Unearthing New Zealand. Wellington, New Zealand: Government Printing Office/Publishing, pp. 51 Fig. 2.1 Maukatua, looking north over Lake Waihola. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Photographer: unknown. Image: Maungatua2.jpg. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Maungatua2.jpg Fig, 2.2 Taieri Bush and Saddle Hill. Source: Alexandra Turnbull Library. Reference number: E-207-q-032. Part of: Buchanan, John: Scrapbook (1856-ca 1890), (E-207-g) Fig. 3.1 Aoraki, Mount Cook. Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Photographer: Miguel A. Monjas. Image: Aoraki-Mount Cook from Hooker Valley.jpg. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Aoraki-Mount_Cook_from_Hooker_Valley.jpg Fig. 3.2 South Bay, Kaikoura. Source: Alexandra Turnbull Library. Reference number: 1/2-021862-G. Part of: Weidner, Negatives of Kaikoura and district (PAColl-3067) Fig. 4.1 Seasonality chart A. Source: Anderson, A. J. 1983. When all the moa ovens grew cold: nine centuries of changing fortune for the southern Maori. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago Heritage Books, pp 43. Fig. 4.2 Seasonality chart B. Source: Dacker, B. 1994. The pain and the love, Te mamae me te aroha: a history of Kai Tahu whanui in Otago, 1844-1994. Dunedin, New Zealand: University of Otago Press in association with the Dunedin City Council, pp 7. Fig. 4.3 Mrs S Burke, in the early twentieth century, placing bark around pōhā/flax bags of salted mutton birds, Solomon Island. Source: Alexandra Turnbull Library. Reference number: PAColl-6001-58. Part of: original photographic prints and postcards from file print collection, Box 7. Fig. 4.4 Wakawaka and Mahika kai models. Source: Anderson, A.J. “Wakawaka and mahinga kai: models of traditional land management in southern New Zealand”, in Davidson, J. Irwin, G. Leach, F. Pawley, A. Brown, D (ed). 1996. Oceanic culture history: essays in honour of Roger Green. New Zealand Journal of archaeology Special Publication, pp 633. Oral informants Due to Category B regulations of the Univeristy of Otago, the anonymity of informants must be protected. Discussions were held with three oral informants during the research for this research project.en_NZ
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