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dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Chrisen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHokowhitu, Brendanen_NZ
dc.date.available2014-11-10T20:16:46Z
dc.date.copyright2007en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationAndersen, C., & Hokowhitu, B. (2007). Whiteness: Naivety, Void and Control. Junctures: The Journal for Thematic Dialogue, (8: Control), 39–49.en
dc.identifier.issn1179-8912en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5172
dc.descriptionPermission kindly granted to reproduce this article from the Junctures editorial board.en_NZ
dc.description.abstractCULTURAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: USES AND MISUSES OF INDIGENOUS “TRADITION” IN A CANADIAN UNIVERSITY Spring, 2001: A renowned architect has agreed to travel to the University of Alberta to engage in a visioning session, led by the University of Alberta’s Native Student Services, for a proposed “Lodge of Learning.” The session is meant to allow “all our spirits to come together in a good way with the blessings of the Creator” (the architect’s words). The session begins in what we are told is “the traditional way”2, part of which involves a smudging ceremony. Most of us partake in the event and, afterwards, the architect prattles on for a bit about being a warrior and “finding your warrior within.” I stifle a yawn as my eyes wander over to the food trays, looking for any cheese Danishes that might have escaped the many eager fingers attending this meeting. He finishes his opening remarks, and an eagle feather (another “traditional” device) is produced to act as a “talking stick” allowing you to speak, uninterrupted, when it’s in your hand. I amuse myself by trying to imagine any of my seven uncles – huge, labourhardened men – requiring a talking stick to make themselves heard, or to make others listen. Oh well…my family and I are Métis, and this seems to be a Cree thing. And when in Rome…The process begins and the feather is passed from hand to hand and voice to voice, in a clockwise direction (which, we are told, is also traditional).en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.relation.ispartofJunctures: The Journal for Thematic Dialogueen_NZ
dc.relation.uriwww.junctures.orgen_NZ
dc.subjectIndigenousen_NZ
dc.subjectUniversityen_NZ
dc.subjectAuthenticityen_NZ
dc.subjectBrendan Hokowhituen_NZ
dc.subjectDr Brendan Hokowhituen_NZ
dc.subjectTe Tumuen_NZ
dc.subjectMaorien_NZ
dc.subjectMāorien_NZ
dc.subjectUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.subjectMétisen_NZ
dc.subjectCanadaen_NZ
dc.subjectChris Andersenen_NZ
dc.subjectUniversity of Albertaen_NZ
dc.subjectNative Studiesen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHM Sociologyen_NZ
dc.titleWhiteness: Naivety, Void and Controlen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.date.accession2009-04-22en_NZ
otago.relation.issue8: Controlen_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage49en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage39en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.identifier.eprintste-tumu70en_NZ
dc.description.refereedTRUEen_NZ
dc.description.referencesM Foucault, “Space, Knowledge, Power,” in J Faubion (ed.), Power: Essential Works of Michel Foucault, 1954-1984 (New York: New Press, 2000). LT Smith, Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples (London: Zed, 1999), 79. J Binney, “Introduction,” in W Yate, An Account of New Zealand and of the Church Missionary Society’s Mission in the Northern Island, 3rd ed. (Shannon: Irish University Press, 1970). A Kuper, The Invention of Primitive Society: Transformations of an Illusion (London: Routledge, 1988). M Foucault, The Archaeology of Knowledge (London: Routledge, 2002), 28-9. Andersen & Hokowhitu – Whiteness – Junctures, 8, Jun 2007 49 M Durie, Whaiora: Máori Health Development, 2nd ed. (Auckland: Oxford University Press, 1998), 29-30. M Durie, Te Mana, Te Káwanatanga: The Politics of Máori Self-Determination (Auckland: Oxford University Press, 1998.en_NZ
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