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dc.contributor.authorBirnie, Johnen_NZ
dc.date.available2014-11-10T20:17:13Z
dc.date.copyright2012en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationBirnie, J. (2012). Online interaction in te reo Māori by beginner/intermediate adult language learners using Facebook and Skype (Dissertation, Master of Indigenous Studies). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5196en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5196
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the possible benefits of online interaction for beginner/intermediate adult learners of te reo Māori (the Māori language), and the implications of online interaction. The research centres round a five week project in which eight adult learners of te reo Māori interacted on Facebook and Skype, with weekly topics and support and guidance provided by the researcher/facilitator. The project clearly showed benefits, including the opportunity for practice in te reo Māori, enjoyment of interaction (particularly on Facebook), linguistic extension through interaction, and provision of a community for isolated learners. Most participants who took part in Skype calls enjoyed them, though it was evident that some Skype calls would have benefited from being more structured and time limited. Some participants also found Skype calls, or the prospect of them, stressful. Findings from the project suggest that linguistic and technical support, along with good moderation and careful grouping of participants, could add significantly to benefits of online interaction, and that the interaction among the participants suggests improvements that could be made in online interaction, and for teaching the Māori language to adult students.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectMāori languageen_NZ
dc.subjectte reo Māorien_NZ
dc.subjectte reoen_NZ
dc.subjectlearning Māori languageen_NZ
dc.subjectonline learningen_NZ
dc.subjectadult online learningen_NZ
dc.subjectSLAen_NZ
dc.subjectSecond Language Acquisitionen_NZ
dc.subjectL2en_NZ
dc.subjectL2 learningen_NZ
dc.subjectadult second language learningen_NZ
dc.subjectsecond language interactionen_NZ
dc.subjectsecond language interaction onlineen_NZ
dc.subjectL2 learning onlineen_NZ
dc.subjectonline L2 interactionen_NZ
dc.subjectL2 interactionen_NZ
dc.subjectSkypeen_NZ
dc.subjectFacebooken_NZ
dc.subjectsocial networken_NZ
dc.subjectWeb 2.0 and second language learningen_NZ
dc.subjectwhakamā.en_NZ
dc.subject.lcshP Philology. Linguisticsen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshPL Languages & literatures of Eastern Asia, Africa, Oceaniaen_NZ
dc.titleOnline interaction in te reo Māori by beginner/intermediate adult language learners using Facebook and Skypeen_NZ
dc.typeDissertationen_NZ
dc.description.versionUnpublisheden_NZ
otago.bitstream.pages112en_NZ
otago.date.accession2013-11-20en_NZ
otago.schoolTe Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific & Indigenous Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineTe Tumu - School of Māori, Pacific & Indigenous Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Indigenous Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters Dissertationen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
dc.identifier.eprintste-tumu103en_NZ
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