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dc.contributor.advisorCrowley, James D
dc.contributor.authorMaloney, Daniel Lewis
dc.date.available2014-11-10T22:25:13Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationMaloney, D. L. (2014). Exploting Palladium-Pyridine-2, 6-dicarboxamide Complexes for the Synthesis of Functionalised Interlocked Architectures (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5204en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5204
dc.description.abstractThe design and synthesis of new types of switchable interlocked architectures that could play a pivotal role in the development of nanotechnology is a key area of research. As such, the development of potential new templating and functionalisation has been attempted. The use of 1,2,3-triazoles as a template for Grubb’s catalysed ring closing metathesis has been explored and shown to be ineffective as a synthetic route to interlocked architecture formation. This is due to the ring closing occurring above the template thread, which has been supported with molecular modelling calculations. The functionalisation of interlocked architectures allows post synthetic modifications to their structure to be explored, such as polymerisation. A singly functionalised [2] catenane has been synthesised in order to test the effects of functionalisation on interlocked architecture formation. The target doubly functionalised [2] catenane could not be synthesised; however the building blocks and synthetic pathway are readily available to produce the target [2] catenane.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectChemistry
dc.titleExploting Palladium-Pyridine-2, 6-dicarboxamide Complexes for the Synthesis of Functionalised Interlocked Architectures
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-11-06T20:53:20Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistry
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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