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dc.contributor.authorRosin, Chris
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Hugh
dc.date.available2014-11-13T00:59:59Z
dc.date.copyright2008
dc.identifier.citationRosin, C., & Campbell, H. (2008). Beyond bifurcation: examining the conventions of organic agriculture in New Zealand. Journal of Rural Studies, 25(1), 35–47.en
dc.identifier.issn0743-0167
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5212
dc.description.abstractThe last 10 years have witnessed numerous attempts to evaluate the merits of new theoretical approaches – ranging from Actor Network Theory to ‘post-structural’ Political Economy and inhabiting a ‘post-Political Economy’ theoretical space – to the explanation of global agricultural change. This article examines Convention Theory (CT) as one such alternative approach, assessing its potential in the context of ongoing change within commercial organic agriculture in New Zealand. More specifically, CT is used to expose the insufficiency of recent ideas of conventionalisation and bifurcation, both reflecting more traditional Political Economic approaches, as explanatory concepts for the emerging condition of the New Zealand organic sector. In this paper, the concept of worlds of justification as developed in CT is utilised to address the emerging complexity of organic production. While farmers supplying a more diversified domestic market can be distinguished from those supplying export markets, an exclusive focus on such distinctions ignores the influential role of extra-economic factors on the viability of organic production systems. Thus, in addition to what are classified as market and industrial worlds in CT, the paper addresses aspects of civic, green, domestic, inspired and renown worlds. Producers’ selections of organic certification organisations are used to demonstrate the interaction of these worlds in the development of the organic sector in New Zealand. The article concludes with the imperative to move ‘beyond bifurcation’ and acknowledge the greater complexity of negotiated outcomes that might be achieved from a CT perspective than from existing political economy-derived models like conventionalisation and bifurcation.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Rural Studiesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0743016708000375en_NZ
dc.subjectAgri-food theoryen_NZ
dc.subjectOrganic agricultureen_NZ
dc.subjectBifurcationen_NZ
dc.subjectConventionalisationen_NZ
dc.subjectConvention theoryen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleBeyond bifurcation: examining the conventions of organic agriculture in New Zealand.en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2014-11-13T00:47:11Z
otago.schoolCentre for Sustainabilityen_NZ
otago.relation.issue1en_NZ
otago.relation.volume25en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage47en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage35en_NZ
otago.openaccessAbstract Onlyen_NZ
dc.rights.statement2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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