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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorFairweather, John
dc.date.available2014-11-18T03:18:27Z
dc.date.copyright2003
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, H., & Fairweather, J. (2003). Environmental Beliefs and Farm Practices of New Zealand Farmers: Contrasting Pathways to Sustainability. Agriculture and Human Values, 20(3), 287–300. doi:10.1023/A:1026148613240en
dc.identifier.issn0889-048X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5230
dc.description.abstractSustainable farming, and ways to achieve it, are important issues for agricultural policy. New Zealand provides an interesting case for examining sustainable agriculture options because gene technologies have not been commercially released and there is a small but rapidly expanding organic sector. There is no strong government subsidization of agriculture, so while policies seem to favour both options to some degree, neither has been directly supported. Results from a survey of 656 farmers are used to reveal the intentions, environmental values, and farming practices for organic, conventional, and GE intending farmers. The results show that organic and conventional farmers are relatively similar but contrast to GE intending farmers, especially with respect to perceived consequences of each technology. While 75%of farmers have not yet made a commitment to either technology, one fifth were GE intending and one quarter may become organic. Organic farmers have different attitudes to nature, matched in part by conventional farmers. In terms of policy for sustainable agriculture, the results suggest that organic and conventional farmers are incrementally moving towards agro-ecological sustainability while GE intending farmers are committed to intensive production methods of which GE products are potentially important. GE intending farmers reject incrementalism in favour of a revolutionary technological fix for sustainability concerns in agriculture. Overall, the results show that there are clearly two different paradigms of sustainability among farmers. Policies that are seeking to achieve sustainable agriculture need to address the tensions that span the different paradigms.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishersen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofAgriculture and Human Valuesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1026148613240en_NZ
dc.subjectAttitudesen_NZ
dc.subjectGene technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectNatureen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectOrganicen_NZ
dc.subjectParadigmsen_NZ
dc.subjectPolicyen_NZ
dc.subjectSustainable farmingen_NZ
dc.titleEnvironmental Beliefs and Farm Practices of New Zealand Farmers: Contrasting Pathways to Sustainabilityen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2014-11-18T02:08:39Z
otago.schoolCentre for Sustainabilityen_NZ
otago.relation.issue3en_NZ
otago.relation.volume20en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/A:1026148613240en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage300en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage287en_NZ
otago.openaccessAbstract Onlyen_NZ
dc.rights.statement© 2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers.en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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