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dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Hugh
dc.contributor.authorMurcott, Anne
dc.contributor.authorMacKenzie, Angela
dc.date.available2014-11-18T03:23:22Z
dc.date.copyright2010
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, H., Murcott, A., & MacKenzie, A. (2010). Kosher in New York City, halal in Aquitaine: challenging the relationship between neoliberalism and food auditing. Agriculture and Human Values, 28(1), 67–79. doi:10.1007/s10460-010-9260-3en
dc.identifier.issn0889-048X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5231
dc.description.abstractPrevious work in the agri-food tradition has framed food auditing as a novelty characteristic of a shift to neoliberal governance in agri-food systems and has tackled the analysis of food “quality” in the same light. This article argues that agri-food scholars’ recent interest in the contested qualities of food needs to be situated alongside a much longer history of contested cultural attributions of trust in food relations. It builds on an earlier discussion suggesting that, although neoliberalism has undoubtedly opened up new spaces for audit activity, older political and social dynamics operating around food audits were established long before the neoliberal historical moment. Breaking new ground (as far as is known) by looking further back than the early history of the organic social movement, it examines intersections of religious food auditing, migrant food culture, and commercial dynamics in food systems. Based on secondary sources, two contrasting case studies are presented to illustrate the flux and complexity for: New World Diaspora migrants to New York City of assuring food was kosher; and more recent Maghrebi migrants to southwest France of assuring food is halal. The article concludes by noting that the neoliberal moment stands not as the unique progenitor of a new style of food authority, but rather as the latest response to a wider rupture in the historically contingent arbitration of new forms of trust in food.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSpringer Science+Business Media B.V.en_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofAgriculture and Human Valuesen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10460-010-9260-3#closeen_NZ
dc.subjectAgri-food systemsen_NZ
dc.subjectFood auditen_NZ
dc.subjectHalalen_NZ
dc.subjectKosheren_NZ
dc.subjectQualityen_NZ
dc.subjectGovernanceen_NZ
dc.subjectTrusten_NZ
dc.titleKosher in New York City, halal in Aquitaine: challenging the relationship between neoliberalism and food auditingen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2014-11-18T02:17:11Z
otago.schoolCentre for Sustainabilityen_NZ
otago.relation.issue1en_NZ
otago.relation.volume28en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10460-010-9260-3en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage79en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage67en_NZ
otago.openaccessAbstract Onlyen_NZ
dc.rights.statement© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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