Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorWoodfield, Timothy Brian Francis
dc.contributor.advisorHooper, Gary
dc.contributor.advisorVissers, Margreet
dc.contributor.authorSchon, Benjamin Sefton
dc.date.available2016-05-31T22:56:45Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.citationSchon, B. S. (2014). Modular assembly for in vitro investigation and engineering of articular cartilage (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5276en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5276
dc.description.abstractArticular cartilage enables locomotion by protecting the ends of the long bones, providing a lubricated low-friction surface for movement, and absorbing and distributing force. It is also a tissue that is often damaged, and has poor intrinsic repair capacity, with damaged articular cartilage often progressing to osteoarthritis. Repair and regeneration of articular cartilage in order to generate structure and function identical to that of native tissue remains difficult. This demonstrates a need for repair strategies, and tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches hold promise as potential repair or regeneration methods. A modular approach to engineering of cartilage may allow separation of the tissue properties into components that can be individually optimised and recombined to a functional construct. Modular assembly is a process where separate components possessing separate functions are combined into a single, functional whole. Modular assembly of cartilage has potential to surmount some of the difficulties of articular cartilage repair and regeneration. In this thesis, I have demonstrated significant advancement of a modular assembly method to assemble tissues and a scaffold in an organised and controlled fashion. I have also shown separate optimisation of the tissue and scaffold components, investigated their interaction, and demonstrated enhanced modularity. This work highlights the potential for 3D tissue assembly in the development of clinically relevant cartilage tissue engineering repair strategies. Mass production of spheroidal microtissues by pellet culture was demonstrated in 96-well plates with minimal effect on chondrogenesis compared to standard tube-based pellet culture. Following this, the flexibility and novel capabilities of the 3D tissue assembly process was demonstrated given that microtissues were able to be arranged in a number of configurations within the 3D scaffold. Microtissue assembly was also shown to negate the surface properties of the scaffold surface. Since the quality of matrix formed was independent of the surface of the scaffold, this meant that modularity of the construct components was enhanced. A model for examining microtissue fusion was then developed, and interactions between microtissues were examined. The effects of soluble, physical and enzymatic factors on fusion were investigated, as well as the influence of cell type on fusion. Finally, appropriate scaffold fabrication with mechanical properties matched to native articular cartilage was achieved, while maintaining tissue module-friendly scaffold architecture. A modular construct was fabricated and assembled with tissue modules formed from human articular and nasal chondrocytes. The assembled constructs again demonstrated the desired mechanical properties in an assembled construct with immature tissue, and the process was able be scaled up to form larger constructs. These results demonstrate a modular assembled construct prepared for introduction to a load-bearing environment in vivo, and demonstrate that modular tissue engineering of articular cartilage has potential as a scalable repair strategy.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectmodular
dc.subjectassembly
dc.subjectcartilage
dc.subjectarticular
dc.subjecttissue engineering
dc.subjectregenerative medicine
dc.subjectarticular cartilage
dc.subjectscaffold
dc.subjectmicrotissue
dc.subjectnasal
dc.subjectMSC
dc.subjectchondrogenesis
dc.subjectfusion
dc.subjectconstruct
dc.titleModular assembly for in vitro investigation and engineering of articular cartilage
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2014-11-24T01:31:55Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineOrthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
otago.evidence.presentYes
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record