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dc.contributor.authorMoller, Henrik
dc.contributor.authorKitson, Jane
dc.contributor.authorDowns, Theresa
dc.date.available2014-12-07T20:28:16Z
dc.date.copyright2009
dc.identifier.citationMoller, H., Kitson, J., & Downs, T. (2009). Knowing by doing: learning for sustainable muttonbird harvesting. New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 36(3), 243–258. doi:10.1080/03014220909510153en
dc.identifier.issn1175-8821
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5348
dc.description.abstractIn a fast‐changing world, successful communication of traditional cultural principles and practices of guardianship and stewardship across generations is more important than ever before. This study investigates knowledge and learning in relation to the last large‐scale customary harvest of a seabird in New Zealand, the titi (Puffinus griseus), by Rakiura Maori. Semi‐directed interviews were conducted with 20 titi‐harvesting elders. We sought firstly to identify the key knowledge‐holders and mechanisms for the transmission of ecological knowledge, as well as the cultural and spiritual beliefs interwoven with harvest practice. Secondly, we sought to identify modern challenges to traditional pathways of learning, and the changing roles of knowledge holders in the harvesting community. Traditional approaches, including observation, hands‐on experience, and storytelling, continue as the main mechanisms for knowledge transmission. Awareness of ancestors (tupuna) and taboo improve compliance of accepted harvesting practices, reinforcing the connection of Rakiura Maori to the harvesting islands and fostering a strong conservation ethic. However, modern needs and pressures appear to threaten the transmission of knowledge between successive generations. The effects, both positive and negative, of the adoption of modern processing, transport and communication techniques within the traditional harvest are considered. Learning and social mechanisms for the titi harvest are based on the foundation of tikanga (protocol) and kaitiakitanga (environmental guardianship), but are demonstrably adaptive, building the resilience and social‐ecological sustainability of this culturally‐fundamental harvest.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofNew Zealand Journal of Zoologyen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03014220909510153#.VIS1lskaOusen_NZ
dc.subjectadaptive co-managementen_NZ
dc.subjectlore and lawen_NZ
dc.subjectPuffinus griseusen_NZ
dc.subjecttikangaen_NZ
dc.subjecttītī harvestingen_NZ
dc.subjectTraditional Ecological Knowledgeen_NZ
dc.titleKnowing by doing: learning for sustainable muttonbird harvestingen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2014-12-07T20:21:45Z
otago.schoolCentre for Sustainabilityen_NZ
otago.relation.issue3en_NZ
otago.relation.volume36en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03014220909510153en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage258en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage243en_NZ
otago.openaccessAbstract Onlyen_NZ
dc.rights.statement© The Royal Society of New Zealand 2009en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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