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dc.contributor.authorMoller, Henrik
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, David
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, P
dc.contributor.authorBell, Brian
dc.contributor.authorFlack, D
dc.contributor.authorBragg, Corey
dc.contributor.authorScott, Darren
dc.contributor.authorNewman, Jamie
dc.contributor.authorMcKechnie, Sam
dc.contributor.authorLyver, Philip
dc.date.available2014-12-07T21:46:07Z
dc.date.copyright2009
dc.identifier.citationMoller, H., Fletcher, D., Johnson, P., Bell, B., Flack, D., Bragg, C., … Lyver, P. (2009). Changes in sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus) abundance and harvesting on the Rakiura Titi Islands. New Zealand Journal of Zoology, 36(3), 325–341. doi:10.1080/03014220909510158en
dc.identifier.issn1175-8821
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5353
dc.description.abstractWe estimated the change in abundance of sooty shearwater (titi, Puffinus griseus) at six Rakiura Titi Islands, New Zealand, by comparing historical and recent surveys of the density of entrances to breeding burrows. We found evidence that entrance density between 1994 and 2006 was lower than it was between 1961 and 1976. Our overall estimate of the annual rate of change in burrow entrance density is ‐1.0% (95% CI ‐2.3 to ‐ 0.1%). Declines have been slower on four islands where Rakiura Maori maintain a traditional harvest of sooty shearwater chicks ("muttonbirding") compared with three unharvested islands. Density‐dependent population processes may explain this difference: rates of decline have been faster in areas of relatively high initial entrance density, and historically the harvested islands have had lower initial density. There was a strong, apparently linear, relationship between entrance density and chick density on breeding colonies, so changes in entrance density probably do indicate a real population decline. The western side of Taukihepa, the largestof the Titi Islands, first became accessible for muttonbirding with the advent of helicopters in the 1970s, but it is unknown whether this has caused an increase in the number of sooty shearwaters harvested by Rakiura Maori.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofNew Zealand Journal of Zoologyen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03014220909510158#.VIS8aMkaOusen_NZ
dc.subjectdensity dependenceen_NZ
dc.subjectharvestingen_NZ
dc.subjectmuttonbirdingen_NZ
dc.subjectpopulation declinesen_NZ
dc.subjectPuffinus griseusen_NZ
dc.subjectsooty shearwatersen_NZ
dc.titleChanges in sooty shearwater (Puffinus griseus) abundance and harvesting on the Rakiura Titi Islandsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2014-12-07T20:54:00Z
otago.schoolCentre for Sustainabilityen_NZ
otago.relation.issue3en_NZ
otago.relation.volume36en_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03014220909510158en_NZ
otago.bitstream.endpage341en_NZ
otago.bitstream.startpage325en_NZ
otago.openaccessAbstract Onlyen_NZ
dc.rights.statement© The Royal Society of New Zealand 2009en_NZ
dc.description.refereedPeer Revieweden_NZ
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