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dc.contributor.authorQuinn, Carolyn Jen_NZ
dc.date.available2011-01-25T00:23:53Z
dc.date.copyright1990en_NZ
dc.identifierhttp://adt.otago.ac.nz/public/adt-NZDU20070601.115004en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationQuinn, C. J. (1990). Stable isotopes and diet : indications of the marine and terrestrial component in the diets of prehistoric populations from New Zealand and the Pacific (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/536en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/536
dc.description.abstractThe importance of marine versus terrestrial foods in prehistoric Pacific and New Zealand diets, and the adaptation of the Polynesian diet to new enviroments, is examined through the analysis of the ratios in human bone of the stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and sulphur. In particular, this study seeks to obtain quantitative information which could provide answers to five main questions, relating to the subsistence focus of the early Lapita colonists in the Pacific, the significance of suger cane in the diets of early Pacific populations, the proportions of reef versus open ocean and terrestrial versus marine foods in these diets, and the identification of populations with pronounced marine or pronounced terrestrial diets. One hundred and nineteen samples of human bone from 13 sites throughtout the Pacific and New Zealand were processed. Nitrogen values were obtained directly from bone powder, while carbon values were determined from collagen produced by digesting bone powder in phosphoric acid. Sulphur evaluations were determined from a BaSo⁴ precipitate, produced after combustion of the collagen samples in a Parr bomb. Interpretation of results is approached from a comparative point of view, which enables the proportions of marine and terrestrial foods in the diets of each study group to be assessed in relation to the diets of all the other groups. Additional information on the composition of the diets is gained by comparing the stable isotope values obtained in this study with published values of other human populations, and of marine and terrrestrial plants and animals. The potential of stable isotope analysis to identify the composition of prehistoric New Zealand and Pacific diets is confirmed. A unique marine adaptation is revealed from the analysis of the Chatham Islands Moriori who appear to have focused almost exclusively on marine resources. In contrast, a highly terrestrial diet is suggested for groups from Nebira in Papua New Guinea and Lake Rotoiti in New Zealand.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightshttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectMaorien_NZ
dc.subjectPapua New Guineaen_NZ
dc.subjectprehistoric peoplesen_NZ
dc.subjectOceaniaen_NZ
dc.subjectdieten_NZ
dc.subjectarchaeologyen_NZ
dc.subjectstrontiumen_NZ
dc.titleStable isotopes and diet : indications of the marine and terrestrial component in the diets of prehistoric populations from New Zealand and the Pacificen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Anthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
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