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dc.contributor.advisorMarshall, Chrisen_NZ
dc.contributor.advisorTrebilco, Paulen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorForman, Marken_NZ
dc.date.available2011-01-25T00:24:11Z
dc.date.copyright2006en_NZ
dc.identifierhttp://adt.otago.ac.nz/public/adt-NZDU20080128.161919en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationForman, M. (2006). The politics of inheritance? : the language of inheritance in Romans within its first-century Greco-Roman Imperial context (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/546en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/546
dc.descriptionxi, 340, [5] leaves :forms ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology and Religious Studies. "December 2006."
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is an exploration of the extent to which Paul's terminology of Inheritance (κληρονόμος) in Romans, and its associated imagery, logic and arguments, functioned to evoke socio-political expectations that were alternative to those which prevailed in contemporary Roman imperial discourse. There are two parts to this study. The first is to take seriously the context of Empire and the claims being made by the Roman Empire in the first century. In particular, what were some of the messages conveyed by the Roman Empire with regard to the structure and purpose, the hopes and expectations, of first-century society? The Christians in Rome were daily exposed to the images and message of Caesar and his successors and there is therefore a need to consider how Paul's language of Inheritance would have sounded within this environment. Second, this study gives attention to the content of Paul's use of the word "inheritance" as it occurs in Romans. In order to address this question, three interrelated ideas are explored. First, for Paul, what does the inheritance consist of? The traditional understanding is that the concept is an entirely spiritualised or transcendent reality. This study proposes a more this-worldly, geographical nature to the word. Second, there is the closely related question of the political nature of inheritance. If it is the case that the language of inheritance has to do with the renewal of the land, then who inherits this land? These two questions raise a third issue-how will the inheritance transpire? Paul's inheritance language contributes to notions of lordship, authority and universal sovereignty for the people of God. Conceivably, the path to this dominion could mirror the hegemonic intentions of imperial Rome which envisages the triumph of one group of people (the strong) over another (the weak). Is this the case with Paul's inheritance language, or does it somehow undermine all claims to power and control? There are five undisputed uses of κληρονόμος and its cognates in Romans-Rom 4:13, 14; Rom 8:17 (three times) and there is one textual variant in Rom 11:1 where the word κληρονομίαν is used in place of τòν λαόν. This study finds that, to varying degrees in each of these texts, the inheritance concept is not only a direct confrontation to other claims to rule, it is also simultaneously a reversal of all other paths to lordship and rule. This study then considers the use of the concept in the two other undisputed Pauline letters where it occurs (Galatians and 1 Corinthians) and also in the disputed letter to the Colossians. The overriding impression is that there is nothing in Galatians, 1 Corinthians or Colossians which significantly challenges the this-worldly, political nature of the language of inheritance in Romans. In these epistles and in Romans Paul employs the language and politics of inheritance in order to subvert the message of Empire.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.languageenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.rightshttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.htmlen_NZ
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectBibleen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Testamenten_NZ
dc.subjectRomansen_NZ
dc.subjecttheologyen_NZ
dc.subjectlanguageen_NZ
dc.subjectstyleen_NZ
dc.subjectEpistles of Paulen_NZ
dc.subjectemperor worshipen_NZ
dc.subjectRomeen_NZ
dc.subjectlegitimacy of governmentsen_NZ
dc.titleThe politics of inheritance? : the language of inheritance in Romans within its first-century Greco-Roman Imperial contexten_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Theology and Religious Studiesen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral Thesesen_NZ
otago.interloanyesen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.voyager1443643
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