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dc.contributor.authorDawes, Gregory W.
dc.date.available2011-02-14T02:44:14Z
dc.date.copyright2003
dc.identifier.citationDawes, G. W. (2003). Religious Studies, Faith, and the Presumption of Naturalism. Journal of Religion and Society, 5.en
dc.identifier.issn1522-5658
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/563
dc.description.abstractIn a recent defence of what he calls "study by religion," Robert Ensign suggests that alleged divine revelations represent public forms of knowledge, which should not be excluded from the academy. But at least according to two major Christian thinkers, namely Thomas Aquinas and John Calvin, revelation is received by an act of faith, which rests on evidence that is person-relative and therefore not open to public scrutiny. If religious studies is to remain a public discipline, whose arguments may be evaluated by believers and non-believers alike, it should maintain its defeasible but not yet defeated presumption of naturalism.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherCreighton Universityen_NZ
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Religion and Societyen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.creighton.edu/JRS
dc.rightsJRS is already an open-access journal.en_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/*
dc.subjectatheismen_NZ
dc.subjecttheism
dc.subjectnaturalism
dc.subjectreligious studies
dc.subjecttheology
dc.titleReligious Studies, Faith, and the Presumption of Naturalismen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
otago.schoolPhilosophyen_NZ
otago.relation.volume5en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
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