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dc.contributor.advisorReese, Elaine
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Joanne
dc.date.available2015-07-08T21:36:59Z
dc.date.copyright2015
dc.identifier.citationTodd, J. (2015). Does media violence make you less helpful? The effect of violent television and literature on prosocial behaviour (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5785en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5785
dc.description.abstractPast research on the effects of media violence has predominantly focused on violent video games and television, with little research looking at the effect of violent literature. Two studies tested the effect of violent television and literature on prosocial behaviour. Study 1 compared the helpfulness of participants after exposure to violent or non-violent television and literature. After a twenty-minute exposure period, the experimenter accidentally knocked a cup of pens to the floor. The number of pens the participant helped to pick up was then recorded. There was no significant difference in helpfulness between the conditions. Study 2 compared the helpfulness of participants after exposure to violent television or literature and a control group who were not exposed to any media. Helpfulness was measured in the same way as in the first study. Study 2 revealed that those exposed to television violence were the least helpful, followed by those exposed to literature violence. These findings support previous research and add new evidence regarding literature violence and prosocial behaviour to the growing literature base.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectviolent media
dc.subjectprosocial behaviour
dc.subjectviolent television
dc.subjectviolent literature
dc.titleDoes media violence make you less helpful? The effect of violent television and literature on prosocial behaviour
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2015-07-08T16:15:43Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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