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dc.contributor.advisorKnight, John
dc.contributor.advisorMather, Damien
dc.contributor.authorVikan, Rasmus
dc.date.available2015-07-14T20:52:53Z
dc.date.copyright2015
dc.identifier.citationVikan, R. (2015). Consumer response to Genetically Modified Salmon: A study on benefit importance in the adoption process (Thesis, Master of Commerce). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/5804en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/5804
dc.description.abstractGenetic modification (GM) can provide benefits for consumers, producers, and the environment; however, general opposition towards the use of GM in food continues, especially GM-animals. This opposition seems to be a consequence of the lack of perceived consumer benefits. This research investigates the role clearly stated consumer benefits may play in the adoption process of GM-salmon. AquaBounty Technologies have developed a transgenic salmon, which is likely to be available for consumption in the next couple of years. Their technology enables the GM-salmon to grow twice as fast as conventional salmon year round, thereby decreasing the production cycles and feed usage. These advantages will presumably lead to a lower market price for the GM-salmon. The benefit one product holds over another is seen as its relative advantage; the benefits used in this study are a price advantage and increased nutritional values. To study the effect of benefits on consumer acceptance, best-worst scaling was used to gather stated preferences (SP), i.e. intentions, while a field choice experiment was used to gather revealed preferences (RP), i.e. actual purchasing behaviour. These methods were chosen due to the hypothetical nature of SP; the field choice experiment could validate the results from best-worst scaling. Therefore, this methodology sets out to test the validity of best-worst scaling and to examine whether consumers acted as they intended since consumers do not always act as they say they will when it comes to adopting an innovation. Additionally, a food neophobia scale (FNS) was included to measure the effect consumers’ preference for novel foods may have on their willingness to try GM-salmon. A fish shop in Norway provided the venue for gathering SPs through a questionnaire and RPs by placing salmon mislabelled as GM on sale alongside conventional salmon. The price benefit was varied by + 15% and – 15% relative to the median price of salmon (118 NOK a kg), and the nutritional benefit was stated as double omega 3 values. The four different types of salmon on display in the field choice experiment or presented in the best-worst scaling were as follows: Conventional Atlantic salmon, Atlantic salmon with double omega 3, Atlantic GM-salmon, and Atlantic GM-salmon with double omega 3. The results were analysed using a Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE), thus creating representative market shares from both methods for each salmon variation. These market shares showed a clear preference for conventional Atlantic salmon compared to GM salmon; however with the added benefit of double omega 3 and a price advantage, GM-salmon showed a substantial increase in market share. In addition, consumers with less neophobic traits, and therefore greater willingness to accept novel foods, were more accepting of GM-salmon. Therefore, consumers’ willingness to accept novel foods is associated with a willingness to accept GM-salmon. In conclusion, best-worst scaling showed similar results as did the field choice experiment, thus stated preferences matched revealed preferences rather well; consumer acceptance of GM-salmon is highly dependent on perceived consumer benefits; without them this product will be “dead in the water” in the Norwegian market. Keywords: Genetically modified food, stated preferences, revealed preferences, diffusion of innovations, benefits
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectGenetically modified food
dc.subjectstated preferences
dc.subjectrevealed preferences
dc.subjectdiffusion of innovations
dc.subjectbenefits
dc.titleConsumer response to Genetically Modified Salmon: A study on benefit importance in the adoption process
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2015-07-14T18:56:39Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Marketing
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Commerce
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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