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dc.contributor.advisorLeckie, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.advisorFrazer, Ian
dc.contributor.authorHofmann, Daniel Alexander
dc.date.available2011-02-16T21:49:33Z
dc.date.copyright2011
dc.identifier.citationHofmann, D. A. (2011). Virtually tribal/tribally virtual: Shareholders in indigeneity (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/590en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/590
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis I will explore the use of computer-mediated communication (CMC) amongst members of the Ngai Tahu tribe, a Maori tribe located on the South Island of New Zealand with tribal members scattered all over the world. The thesis topic originated out of previous research in which I investigated why the tribal corporate, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu (TRoNT), had developed a web presence. During the prior research employees of TRoNT made arguments for the use of inner-tribal CMC. This thesis was intended to explore whether or not these arguments were accepted by tribal members. During the course of this research the focus shifted towards a more encompassing view on tribal membership and how the use of CMC influences the understanding of tribal membership. I will argue in this thesis that the use of CMC has not engendered but emphasised existing tensions between many locally active and distant or passive tribal members but at the same time new communication technologies also offer possibilities to overcome these tensions. To make this argument I will show that a part of the tribal membership and the iwi corporate, TRoNT, favour an inclusive membership discourse, focusing on a single entry criterion, ancestry. For this group within the iwi the use of CMC is a possibility to further inner-tribal democracy with distant and passive tribal members being able to participate in inner-tribal debates without being physically present. Other, mostly locally active members argue that ancestry only generates the potential for membership and that actual membership is reliant on physical participation. For this group the use of CMC as a form of participation is of limited value only and further threatens to undermine the status of locally active members by equalising all members. Lastly I will show that despite the resistance against CMC for inner-tribal communication all of my interview partners used CMC to a greater or lesser extent to stay in contact with family members who were temporarily or permanently geographically distant. Family web sites and emails are used for this purpose. This use, I argue, creates a tribal network of partially autonomous family networks. The thesis is based on 52 ethnographic interviews held with tribal members, TRoNT employees, and members of the public closely working with the tribe. The interviews were interpreted through a dual focus on literature concerning tribal segmentation, and the concept of the network society (Castells 2000). The literature on tribal segmentation shows the fluidity of the social structure of Maori society and the influence of colonial ruling with the resulting ossification of the social structure. The literature further shows that forces within Maori society are at play which have aimed for the installation of iwi as the main body of Maori culture and political representation. The concept of the network society in turn offers a widely accepted terminology for processes at work within the Ngai Tahu tribe, but also within other locales, making it clear that the current processes within the Ngai Tahu tribe are not unique.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.rights.urihttp://www.otago.ac.nz/administration/policies/otago003228.html
dc.subjectOnline communicationen_NZ
dc.subjecttribal cohesionen_NZ
dc.subjectNgai Tahuen_NZ
dc.subjectsettlementen_NZ
dc.subjectMaorien_NZ
dc.subjectinclusive membership discourseen_NZ
dc.subjectexclusive membership discourseen_NZ
dc.subjectglobal membershipen_NZ
dc.subjectlocally active membersen_NZ
dc.subjectcomputer-mediated communicationen_NZ
dc.subjectwhakapapaen_NZ
dc.subjectparticipationen_NZ
dc.subjectnetwork societyen_NZ
dc.subjectCastellsen_NZ
dc.subjectspace of flowsen_NZ
dc.subjectgrass-rootingen_NZ
dc.subjectTRoNTen_NZ
dc.subjecttribal tensionen_NZ
dc.subjectactive membershipen_NZ
dc.subjectpotential membershipen_NZ
dc.subjecttribal democracyen_NZ
dc.subjecttribal segementationen_NZ
dc.subjectfamily networksen_NZ
dc.subjectqualitative researchen_NZ
dc.subjectethnographic interviewsen_NZ
dc.titleVirtually tribal/tribally virtual: Shareholders in indigeneityen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2011-02-16T21:06:33Z
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral Theses
otago.openaccessOpen
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