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dc.contributor.advisorJohnson, Henry
dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Oli
dc.contributor.advisorDrummond, John
dc.contributor.authordu Plessis, Heleen
dc.date.available2015-10-27T01:25:52Z
dc.date.copyright2015
dc.identifier.citationdu Plessis, H. (2015). Cello for Africa (Thesis, Doctor of Musical Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6001en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6001
dc.description.abstractThis exegesis is an accompaniment to the CD Cello for Africa – a collection of innovative musical compositions for cello by South African composers, commissioned to specifically explore an original sound combination by merging diverse musical cultures and instruments, thereby creating a forum for cultural interaction within the diverse South African setting. The CD recording represents the outcome of a four-year research process and a musical and personal journey with my cello into the Africa of my birth and heritage, and counts as the fourth performance towards meeting the requirements for the DMA. The purpose of the exegesis is to make explicit what the objectives of the CD project were, and to explain the methodological steps that were taken to complete it. The discussion about the works, the collaborations with composers and musicians, and the reception of the performance demonstrate how the objectives have been fulfilled. Furthermore, the exegesis explains how the research contributes to new knowledge. The process of creating the document has been one of reflection, and engages with the methodology of autoethnography. The first part explains how the project came about as a result of personal questioning of my identity as an expatriate South African. It includes a review of South African music for cello, exploring characteristics of South African music, as well as my work with selected composers, and ends with an explanation of the works I commissioned. The second part explains the process of bringing the works to performance in terms of logistics and my own performance preparations. The third part explores autoethnography as a mode of reflection and the methods associated with it. The themes that surfaced from the story about the circumstances and intentions behind the project deal with identity formation, a sense of, and a connection to, place and intercultural collaboration with reference to contemporary writing on the subjects of music, identity and place. The fourth and final part deals with the reception of the music, the personal consequences of it, and plans for further projects along the same lines.  
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectMusic/performance, identity and place
dc.subjectIdentity, place and emigration
dc.subjectPractice-based research
dc.subjectAutoethnography
dc.subjectSouth African music
dc.subjectSouth Africanness
dc.subjectAfricanness
dc.subjectMusic and appropriation
dc.subjectMusic and reconciliation
dc.subjectMusic and cultural collaboration/interaction
dc.subjectSouth African expatriate
dc.subjectPracticing, listening, embodiment, empathy
dc.subjectPeter Klatzow
dc.subjectHans Huyssen
dc.subjectA sense of place, Klatzow (2012)
dc.subjectConcerto for an African cellist, Huyssen (2013)
dc.subjectSonata for cello and piano by Peter Klatzow (2010)
dc.subjectMeki Nzewi
dc.subjectsurface electromyography
dc.subjectcello and mbira
dc.subjectcello and marimba
dc.titleCello for Africa
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2015-10-26T23:49:47Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Musical Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.interloanyes
otago.openaccessOpen
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