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dc.contributor.advisorTolich, Martin
dc.contributor.advisorBarusch, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorDaniher, Roland
dc.date.available2015-12-14T19:55:21Z
dc.date.copyright2015
dc.identifier.citationDaniher, R. (2015). Scary Uncertainty: An Analysis of Social-Role Control Among Community-Dwelling Retirees in New Zealand (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6110en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6110
dc.description.abstractWith New Zealand’s ageing population increasing, knowledge on ageing citizens’ intentions and retirement lifestyles is of growing importance for future government policies. Most research to date, however, has been quantitative. New Zealand lacks in-depth micro-level forms of qualitative analysis on ageing citizens’ retirement intentions and experiences. This research conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 participants, all above the pension age (65 years). Listening to their ageing experiences, I focused on how successfully these participants executed their retirement goals. Data were analysed through thematic analysis. Key transitional life-events during participants’ ageing years included leaving the workforce, death of spouse, or the onset of a serious illness. Participants who had these life-events experienced significant alterations to their self-concept, retirement intentions and behaviour. Three types of social networks were influential on participants’ retirement: geographically close friends, children and grandchildren, and their spouse. The influence and significance of these relationships differed, reflecting some of the variation among New Zealand’s ageing population. All participants displayed the New Zealand Positive Ageing Strategy’s concept of positive ageing. However, individual factors were more influential over participants’ living situations, as opposed to effective government policies or local council actions. Furthermore, the Positive Ageing Strategy places little emphasis on ageing citizens’ family-lives, as well as the common trend of retirees wanting time for leisure and self-discovery. More qualitative research on other sub-groups in New Zealand’s ageing population is required to facilitate effective government policies and region-specific issues.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectRetirement
dc.subjectAgeing
dc.subjectPension
dc.titleScary Uncertainty: An Analysis of Social-Role Control Among Community-Dwelling Retirees in New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2015-12-14T05:53:50Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Sociology, Gender and Social Work
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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