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dc.contributor.advisorSpencer, Hamish
dc.contributor.authorSanture, Anna Wensley
dc.date.available2016-02-01T22:21:31Z
dc.date.copyright2006
dc.identifier.citationSanture, A.W. (2006). Quantitative genetic models for genomic imprinting (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6193
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6193
dc.description.abstractA gene is imprinted when its expression is dependent on the sex of the parent from which it was inherited. An increasing number of studies are suggesting that imprinted genes have a major influence on medically, agriculturally and evolutionarily important traits, such as disease severity and livestock production traits. While some genes have a large effect on the traits of an individual, quantitative characters such as height are influenced by many genes and by the environment, including maternal effects. The interaction between these genes and the environment produces variation in the characteristics of individuals. Many quantitative characters are likely to be influenced by a small number of imprinted genes, but at present there is no general theoretical model of the quantitative genetics of imprinting incorporating multiple loci, environmental effects and maternal effects. This research develops models for the quantitative genetics of imprinting incorporating these effects, including deriving expressions for genetic variation and resemblances between relatives. Imprinting introduces both parent-of-origin and generation dependent differences in the derivation of standard quantitative genetic models that are generally equivalent under Mendelian expression. Further, factors such as epistasis, maternal effects and interactions between genotype and environment may mask the effect of imprinting in a quantitative trait. Maternal effects may also mimic a number of signatures in variance and covariance components that are expected in a population with genomic imprinting. This research allows a more comprehensive understanding of the processes influencing an individual’s characteristics.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.titleQuantitative genetic models for genomic imprintingen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
dc.date.updated2016-02-01T22:20:57Z
thesis.degree.disciplineZoologyen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_NZ
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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