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dc.contributor.advisorTreharne, Gareth
dc.contributor.advisorSnell, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorBarham, Anna Hazel Copeland
dc.date.available2016-02-21T19:42:33Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationBarham, A. H. C. (2016). Living With an Invisible Neurological Condition: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis Study (Thesis, Master of Science). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6226en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6226
dc.description.abstractLiving with an invisible neurological condition can involve physical, cognitive and psychosocial challenges. The aim of this study was to explore the experience of living with an invisible neurological condition, particularly focusing on life within the context of the family. Four people were interviewed: a man and a woman with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a man and a woman with prosopagnosia (face-blindness). The participants’ ages ranged from 44 to 68 years, and all four were married with children whose ages ranged from preschool to adult. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using a blend of thematic analysis and Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) methodology. Four major themes were developed: 1) Feeling different; 2) Learning to cope; 3) Loneliness; and 4) Moral failure. 1) The participants felt that their experiences were “bizarre”, and they contrasted themselves with “normal” people and/or with their pre-injury selves. 2) The participants had learned and were learning strategies to cope with their condition including avoidance, acceptance of limitations, and active problem-solving. 3) The participants were lonely at times. They found social interaction difficult, but they wanted to be understood. 4) They felt that they did things that were somewhat shameful in order to live with their condition. They felt guilty when they were unable to meet their own and others’ expectations, and believed that others judged them unfairly. This study extends the TBI literature by showing that there are similarities between the lived experiences of TBI and of another neurological condition. It enhances the literature regarding the lived experience of prosopagnosia, where little qualitative research has been done until recently. The findings demonstrate some of the psychosocial consequences of prosopagnosia and TBI. Health practitioners may benefit from having more awareness of these consequences in order to be better able to help people with these conditions to live well.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectprosopagnosia
dc.subjecttraumatic brain injury
dc.subjectTBI
dc.subjectIPA
dc.subjectphenomenology
dc.subjectqualitative
dc.subjectlived experience
dc.subjectinterpretative phenomenological analysis
dc.subjecthead injury
dc.subjectface blindness
dc.subjectfamily
dc.subjectinvisible
dc.titleLiving With an Invisible Neurological Condition: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis Study
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-02-19T22:37:32Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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