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dc.contributor.advisorOmer-Cooper, John
dc.contributor.advisorBrooking, Tom
dc.contributor.authorReeves, Jane
dc.date.available2016-03-07T22:18:57Z
dc.date.copyright1989
dc.identifier.citationReeves, J. (1989). Maori prisoners in Dunedin, 1869-1872 and 1879-1881 : exiled for a cause (Dissertation, Bachelor of Arts (Honours)). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6257en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6257
dc.description.abstractThe exile of Maori prisoners to Dunedin in 1869 and again in 1879, was due to the Northern wars and the confiscation of land in Taranaki by the Government. Maori never accepted the 'justice' imposed on them and active resistance to the confiscations continued throughout the 1860's, 1870's and 1880's. The first group of prisoners to reach Dunedin were Pakakohe men who had been allied with Titokowaru and his armed resistance to the confiscations. The second group were from Parihaka, they also resisted the land alienation, but passively. This dissertation addresses the reasons for the Government's imprisonment of Taranaki Maori, and it examines the legislation passed in 1879-80. It also concentrates on the general experiences of the prisoners in Dunedin. These include the work they were involved in, living conditions and health, and finally the relationships that were formed between the prisoners and Otakou Maori. I have not explored the political and religious philosophies of Titokowaru or Te Whiti, nor have I delved into the experiences of Maori prisoners exiled in Wellington, Lyttleton, Hokitika or Ripapa Island. Therefore, this dissertation is an introduction to a larger subject, and one that deserves extensive research. Part of the research included oral history. However in exploring the use of such a resource I also discovered the special demands that it places onto the researcher, and the restrictions that a time limit imposes. To do justice to oral sources, several years’ research would be required. The scarcity of information on some aspects of the study also imposed limitations and has had some effect on the structure of the essay. Much of the available information is non-specific and does not differentiate Maori prisoners from Pakeha prisoners. The study has therefore included an element of conjecture.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.titleMaori prisoners in Dunedin, 1869-1872 and 1879-1881 : exiled for a causeen_NZ
dc.typeDissertation
dc.date.updated2016-03-07T22:18:31Z
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Arts (Honours)en_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelHonours Dissertation
otago.openaccessOpenen_NZ
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