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dc.contributor.advisorLongnecker, Nancy
dc.contributor.advisorBishop, Phil
dc.contributor.authorGoodwin, Jonas
dc.date.available2016-04-05T04:47:35Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationGoodwin, J. (2016). Discovering Nature through Mobile Gaming (Thesis, Master of Science Communication). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6333en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6333
dc.description.abstractCasual video games and nature outreach face similar challenges when engaging audiences, and may have much to offer one another from within their respective realms. The aims of this project were to examine casual mobile video games as a means of encouraging engagement with nature, as well as whether factual content has a place within the non-serious gaming industry. This was achieved through two studies using the commercially successful free-to-play game Flutter: Butterfly Sanctuary. Quantitative player metrics and qualitative self-report methods drew results from over 180,000 active players and were used to assess engagement through sub-factors relating to learning and interest. While a direct measure of learning remained elusive, an analysis of metrics results revealed players to be performing very well at identifying species within the context of the game. Supporting survey analyses revealed Flutter to extend interest in butterFlies beyond the game with some groups. Additional results revealed players to be engaging with the factual content, and identifying it as a positive factor when making decisions about sharing and spending. It was also revealed that many players had difFiculty distinguishing non-factual from factual elements within the game. On the basis of these results, I conclude that games like Flutter may help sustain engagement with real world content, which in turn can be responsibly utilised by game developers to engage and offer depth to their audience.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectnature
dc.subjectengagement
dc.subjectyoung adult
dc.subjectFlutter: Butterfly Sanctuary
dc.subjectvideo games
dc.subjectawareness
dc.subjectinterest
dc.subjectoutreach
dc.subjectplayer metrics
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjectcommercial gaming
dc.subjectmobile technology
dc.subjectpublic engagement
dc.subjectcomputer games
dc.subjectentertainment
dc.subjectcasual games
dc.subjectfree-to-play
dc.subjectbutterfly
dc.titleDiscovering Nature through Mobile Gaming
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-04-05T00:38:12Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineZoology
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science Communication
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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