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dc.contributor.advisorFitzgerald, Ruth
dc.contributor.advisorBourk, Michael
dc.contributor.authorWardell, Susan Edith
dc.date.available2016-04-14T21:25:51Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationWardell, S. E. (2016). Living in the Tension: A cross-cultural comparative study of the meaning and management of care, self-care, and wellbeing across two communities of faith-based youth workers. (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6382en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6382
dc.description.abstractThis ethnographic project explored how faith-based youth workers in two communities – Moment of Truth Evangelistic Ministries (MOTEM) in Kampala, Uganda, and Canterbury Youth Services (CYS) in Canterbury, New Zealand – managed and made sense of their own wellbeing, against an ongoing tension between care and self-care. The comparative approach enabled an examination of two local articulations of a global faith system, as well as two situated examples of the effect of neoliberalism on the faith-based organisations (FBOs). The experience of burnout, as a culturally-grounded idiom of distress with strong ties in existing literature to care labour and the non-profit sector, was the entry point into this study. The analysis of interviews, focus group material, primary texts and ethnographic field notes drew heavily from a narrative discourse approach. This highlighted the significance of language, metaphor, and narrative in their sense-making, but with a performativity focus that examined these not as static texts, but as part of subject formation. This study also applied a post-structuralist perspective to examining the discursive construction of the ‘good’ leader in a specific historical moment. This provided context for the moral and emotional labour observed in each site My findings were that balance, paradox, and re-categorisation were key techniques used to manage discursive tension. Such strategies were both storied and embodied. Distinctive local ‘aesthetics’ which patterned practice were also identified, including self-awareness and balance (in Canterbury), and self-control and empowerment (in Kampala). Through all of these, neoliberal discourses were shown to be contributing to a responsibilisation of the youth leader for their own wellbeing. Ultimately, although numerous institutional and ideological forces are at work in their complex and morally-fraught social fields, faith-based youth workers exercise creativity, agency and resilience in navigating these to maintain their cherished identities and manage their wellbeing whilst conducting the demanding care labour involved.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectUganda
dc.subjectYouth work
dc.subjectChristian
dc.subjectFaith-based
dc.subjectreligion
dc.subjectspirituality
dc.subjectneoliberalism
dc.subjectwork
dc.subjectorganisation studies
dc.subjectsocial work
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectwellbeing
dc.subjectmental health
dc.subjectburnout
dc.subjectcomparative
dc.subjecttheodicy
dc.subjectdiscourse
dc.subjectemotion
dc.subjectemotional labour
dc.subjectcompassion fatigue
dc.subjectChristchurch
dc.subjectKampala
dc.subjectself-care
dc.titleLiving in the Tension: A cross-cultural comparative study of the meaning and management of care, self-care, and wellbeing across two communities of faith-based youth workers.
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-04-14T06:11:37Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology and Archaeology
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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