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dc.contributor.advisorClements, Kevin
dc.contributor.advisorDevere, Heather
dc.contributor.advisorJackson, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorSvensson, Isak
dc.contributor.authorMasters, Christopher John
dc.date.available2016-06-01T21:02:29Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationMasters, C. J. (2016). ‘Instruments of Peace?’ Franciscans as Peacemakers in Sri Lanka During and After the Civil War (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6521en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6521
dc.description.abstractPeople of religious belief are uniquely placed to become engaged in active forms of peacemaking as religious peacebuilders. There is, however, little research into how particular religious groups have been able to draw on their deeply held religious values and experiences to respond as peacemakers to the violence around them. This thesis is an attempt to explore part of this research gap by studying Franciscans during the civil war in Sri Lanka (1983-2009) and in the following years. The research question, “What are the factors motivating decisions for active peacemaking engagement by Franciscans living in Sri Lanka?” breaks down into three dimensions: the roles of (a) faith, (b) life in religious community and (c) Franciscan identity. These were looked at through the theoretical perspectives of frame alignment and resource mobilisation. The research propositions that emerged were explored through a convergent parallel mixed methods approach using a written questionnaire, individual interviews and group discussions in a variety of field locations in Sri Lanka in 2013 and 2014. The findings fall into three groups: Faith. A narrow fundamentalist style of faith was negatively correlated with a range of peacemaking activities during the conflict and immediately afterwards. Conversely, a style of faith that appreciated the wisdom of other faiths was positively correlated with active peacemaking from during the conflict through to the current period.Community Life. Those living in healthily functional communities were able to engage as communities with those around them, using their community life to create radical new forms of presence with others. Those living in less functional communities were more likely to be engaged in individual ministries and to lack resilience in the face of external difficulties. Franciscan Identity. The Franciscans observed fell into several distinct groups. There was a small elite with a high knowledge of Franciscan sources whose peacemaking was predominantly in high profile elite and leadership roles. There was also a larger set with less knowledge of the sources but who were involved in peacemaking within an existing community ministry, or as individuals. Finally, there was a distinct group with very little knowledge of Francis but a strongly devotional, pietistic approach, whose ministry as peacemakers focused on prayer and pastoral visits.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectSri Lanka
dc.subjectPeacemaking
dc.subjectFranciscans
dc.subjectFaith
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectReligious Community
dc.title“Instruments of Peace?” Franciscans as Peacemakers in Sri Lanka During and After the Civil War
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-06-01T08:32:13Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineNational Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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