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dc.contributor.advisorJaye, Chrystal
dc.contributor.advisorMurrel-McMillan, Kirsty
dc.contributor.authorRowe, Joanne
dc.date.available2016-07-07T03:22:08Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationRowe, J. (2016). What are ‘functional social supports’ and how do they impact the desire to self harm in individuals who have a history of intentional self harm? (Thesis, Master of Health Sciences). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6677en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6677
dc.description.abstractBackground: Intentional self-harm is a phenomenon which has become an international public health issue around the world, and one which has a extensive financial and social impact within communities. Poor relationship dynamics have been shown in the literature to have a negative impact on the psyche of a person, which is capable of increasing anxiety and decreasing self-esteem, both of which have been shown to be significant contributors to self-harm behaviours. As such, individuals who self-harm have been marginalised within society, and often feel alienated from their peers. In contrast, positive social supports, have been discussed in the literature as potentially being a cost-effective and constructive approach in diminishing reliance on self-harm behaviours. Aims: This qualitative study investigated the aspects of professional, social, familial, and romantic relationships that people who have self-harmed identified as having a positive and constructive impact on their self-harm behaviour. Method: Twelve participants with a history of self-harming behaviours were recruited through free press advertising in primary care and interviewed. The participants ranged in age from 19 to 70 years old, and represented NZ European and Māori from across the Southern region of New Zealand. Findings: This study shows that constructive relationships which positively influence self-harm behaviours are characterised by participants’ perceptions of authenticity in the relationship, and that the other person genuinely cares. This was also what individuals who self-harm need from their health professionals in order to support the adaptation of damaged view of self, and enable formation of functional relationships within society. Based on the results of this study, greater understanding for health professionals, whanau and friends on the relationship needs of those who self-harm can be realised.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectself-harm
dc.subjectfunctional
dc.subjectsocial
dc.subjectsupports
dc.titleWhat are “functional social supports” and how do they impact the desire to self harm in individuals who have a history of intentional self harm?
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-07-07T02:38:21Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of General Practice and Rural Health
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Sciences
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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