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dc.contributor.advisorWalker, Peter
dc.contributor.advisorSandretto, Susan
dc.contributor.authorRoxborogh, Phillip Andrew
dc.date.available2016-10-14T01:44:51Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationRoxborogh, P. A. (2016). Understanding How Mature Students Make Sense of Success in the Social Work Programme at the University of Otago (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6841en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6841
dc.description.abstractMy thesis explores how mature students, those aged 25 or older, understand the knowledges necessary for success in the social work programme at the University of Otago. In this thesis I argue that there is a social logic that underpins the programme which sits below the awareness of all involved and acts to marginalise those who lack the knowledges privileged by that logic. In turn, I propose that when staff, mature and non-mature students, the university, and the social work profession make use of this information, they can foster an environment where student success is revolutionised. My vision is a programme where everyone is successful and no one is marginalised. As a starting point, I have included a table of contents of a student success guide for future discussion. The use of Pierre Bourdieu’s thinking tools allow this social logic to be revealed in all its complexity. As such, my study was conducted as a qualitative research endeavour, where the work of Bourdieu and Wacquant (1992) informed an analysis of the social work programme at a government, profession and programme level to reveal the social logic in operation. I then utilised an online survey combined with follow-up focus group and semi-structured interview events to determine how staff and students made sense of my findings for maximising student success. My thesis contributes to the debates on 1) using the work of Bourdieu to analyse the dynamics of power in an education context to bring to the surface the social logic of a field of interactions, 2) using that knowledge as a basis for bringing about the positive social transformation of those in marginalised positions by equipping struggling agents to play the social game better, and by changing the game itself to be more supportive of struggling, and, 3) how the transformation of the experience of struggling agents requires the enabling actions of those in positions of power.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectSocial Work
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectMature Students
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectStudent Success
dc.subjectPierre Bourdieu
dc.subjectCapitial
dc.subjectHabitus
dc.subjectField
dc.titleUnderstanding How Mature Students Make Sense of Success in the Social Work Programme at the University of Otago
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-10-14T01:09:50Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineSociology, Gender and Social Work
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
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