Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDevere, Heather
dc.contributor.authorHitchcock, Stacey Maree
dc.date.available2016-10-19T19:43:25Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationHitchcock, S. M. (2016). Ownership of Resource Extraction and Violence: How private versus state-owned resource extraction effects the severity of violence (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6853en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6853
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between natural resources and conflict has been extensively scrutinised in the field of peace and conflict studies. However, the effect of the ownership structure of resource extraction on violence requires further investigation. This article aims to describe the relationship between private and state-owned resource extraction and the severity of violence that states experience in Africa and Latin America 1989-2014. I argue that the ownership of resource extraction is significant because potential rebel groups will commit to the most effective and feasible strategy of violence depending on the anticipated response from the government and extraction company. When resource extraction is privately owned, rebel groups are likely to use low-level violence, whereas, when resource extraction is state-owned, rebel groups are more likely to initiate high-level violence and civil war. These conjectures are tested with a quantitative logistic regression analysis of the relationship between ownership of extraction and violence severity. I have collected original data on the ownership of mineral and oil and gas extraction projects for these countries 1989-2014. The results suggest when resource extraction is privately owned the likelihood of higher levels of violence decreases, and when resource extraction is state-owned the likelihood of higher levels of violence increases.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNatural resources
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectExtraction
dc.subjectState-owned
dc.subjectPrivate
dc.subjectAfrica
dc.subjectLatin America
dc.titleOwnership of Resource Extraction and Violence: How private versus state-owned resource extraction effects the severity of violence
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-10-19T07:41:29Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineNational Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record