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dc.contributor.advisorHalberstadt, Jamin Brett
dc.contributor.authorSecher, Jo Nathan
dc.date.available2016-11-01T20:51:12Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationSecher, J. N. (2016). Overhyped and Underresearched: What Explains Risk Perception of Malicious Hazards? (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6879en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6879
dc.description.abstractA hazard is a source of risk that can pose a threat to life. Across most cultures, human life is valued very highly, and societies are willing to pay a large amount to prevent people dying prematurely. There are some hazards, though, that societies seem to regard as particularly important to prevent to the extent that they are not only willing to pay considerably more to avert deaths caused by them but they are also willing to cede rights and liberties previously enjoyed in exchange for protection from them. My research found that these hazards, which are characterised by violent acts committed by people against each other, constitute their own subset of hazards which I refer to as ‘malicious’ hazards. It further revealed that malicious hazards are characterised by high moral significance and low controllability. In addition, risk from this subset of hazards is overestimated, whereas risk from hazards in other categories is either underestimated or correctly estimated. Considering the aspects of malicious hazards that separate them from other hazards, I observed that they are the only type of hazard involving a consciously acting agent deliberately harming others, and that they are more angering than other types of hazards. I then independently manipulated the factors of agency belief and anger. My results showed that anger increased risk perception relative to control participants, but that there was no effect of agency belief on risk perception. In the General Discussion I emphasise the need to identify a valid agency belief manipulation and I conclude that because of anger’s role in creating demand for often harmful risk mitigation measures, risk communication about malicious hazards should be tailored so as to minimise its potential to elicit anger.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectAnger
dc.subjectRisk
dc.subjectPerception
dc.subjectAgency
dc.subjectPriming
dc.subjectSadness
dc.subjectSad
dc.subjectVelten
dc.subjectTerrorism
dc.subjectCrime
dc.subjectMalicious
dc.subjectHazards
dc.subjectAgent
dc.subjectScenarios
dc.subjectViolent
dc.subjectViolence
dc.subjectIntent
dc.subjectTaxonomy
dc.subjectEmotion
dc.titleOverhyped and Underresearched: What Explains Risk Perception of Malicious Hazards?
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-11-01T05:13:22Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Psychology
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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