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dc.contributor.advisorCampbell, Hugh
dc.contributor.advisorBond, Sophie
dc.contributor.advisorLegun, Katharine
dc.contributor.advisorRosin, Chris
dc.contributor.authorHall, Madeline
dc.date.available2016-11-06T20:24:09Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationHall, M. (2016). From ‘Producers’ to ‘Polluters’: Farmers’ experience in the Lake Taupō Water Quality Trading Program (Thesis, Master of Arts). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6891en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6891
dc.description.abstractImprovement of freshwater quality within New Zealand poses a threat not only to the country’s treasured and pristine waterways, but the culturally and economically dominant agricultural sector as well. Encompassing the nation’s largest lake, the Lake Taupō catchment is considered a national treasure and supports a large tourism industry. After discovering a decline in water clarity in 1999 due to excess nitrogen (N) leaching, the Waikato Regional Council worked with stakeholders to cap the total amount of N in the catchment, implement a cap and trade programme, and create a quasi-government institution to reduce N outputs by 20%. Farmers in the catchment were, for first time in the country’s history, treated in a formal regulatory context as polluters rather than solely agricultural producers. They were also instrumental in creating a new and experimental market based regulatory regime. Using a governmentality approach, this Master’s research will focus on the situated and contextual nature of Lake Taupō farmers’ experiences in this market-based environmental governance system. With this methodology, I examine how we think about governance and government. I focus on the people within, and thought behind, the market-based environmental governance occurring within the Lake Taupo catchment. I investigate farmer characterizations of self and focus on how the farming community questioned the way things were and how they came to be. I do not evaluate the environmental outcomes of the program. Rather, I have investigated how the market-based tool privileged certain ‘rational’ actions, how its practices came to be contested, and how its logics have potentially become solidified within the community. To inform this case study, interviews with eighteen farmers and seven other stakeholders in March of 2015 were analysed and coded using a Foucauldian discourse analysis. This research concludes that over the fifteen years of policy negotiation and implementation, farmer in the catchment transitioned over time from being constituted as ‘producers’, to ‘polluters’, to ‘nitrogen managers’. The market based tool that was implemented did not necessarily change farmers’ environmental beliefs but did require an ‘environmental’ concern to become centralized in farmers’ businesses. This research offers insight into the relevance of farmers’ subjectivities to understand the dynamics and outcomes of a market based policy instrument to manage pollution from agricultural sources.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectNeoliberalism
dc.subjectGovernmentality
dc.subjectLake Taupo
dc.subjectWater Quality
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectSubjectivity
dc.subjectFarmers
dc.titleFrom ‘Producers’ to ‘Polluters’: Farmers’ experience in the Lake Taupō Water Quality Trading Program
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-11-06T06:49:41Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Sociology, Gender and Social Work
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.interloanyes
otago.openaccessOpen
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