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dc.contributor.authorCarr, Anna Men_NZ
dc.date.available2011-04-07T03:01:53Z
dc.date.copyright1997-11en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationCarr, A. M. (1997). Clients’ motivations, perceptions, expectations and satisfaction levels: The New Zealand mountain guiding industry (p. 4). Presented at the Quality Tourism: Beyond the Masses, Proceedings of the First National Tourism Students’ Conference.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/696
dc.description.abstractMountain guiding has been offered as an activity for tourists to New Zealand for over a century. In the late Nineteenth Century European guides, accompanying clients, introduced techniques to New Zealanders working at the first Hermitage Hotel at Mt Cook who then chose mountain guiding as their profession. Guides today continue a tradition based on experience, skills and knowledge that enables them to operate as successfully as the mountains will allow. The New Zealand Mountain Guides association (NZMGA) has a qualification framework, certification and safety standards that are internationally recognised by the International Union of Mountain Guides (UIAGM). Companies offer year-round activities such as heli-skiing, avalanche courses, glacier walks, trekking, mountaineering and rock climbing courses, ice climbing and high guiding. The latter ranges from high altitude tramping, e.g. the Copland Pass, to ascents of major peaks in New Zealand or overseas in Europe, Nepal, South America, Alaska and Antarctica. Issues faced by the NZMGA include competition from overseas companies, concession procedures, maintaining traditional markets and seeking new ones, access to Mt Cook/Aoraki under Treaty claims, increased aircraft noise affecting product quality and potential conflict with other user groups. Over the 1997/98 summer climbing season the writer will conduct research focussing on the clients of NZMGA guides.en_NZ
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.subjectNew Zealand Mountain Guides’ Associationen_NZ
dc.subjectclientsen_NZ
dc.subjectperceptionsen_NZ
dc.subjectmotivationsen_NZ
dc.subjectexperienceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF Commerceen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshHF5601 Accountingen_NZ
dc.subject.lcshGV Recreation Leisureen_NZ
dc.titleClients’ motivations, perceptions, expectations and satisfaction levels: The New Zealand mountain guiding industryen_NZ
dc.typeConference or Workshop Item (Paper)en_NZ
dc.description.versionPublisheden_NZ
otago.date.accession2007-06-25en_NZ
otago.relation.pages4en_NZ
otago.openaccessOpen
dc.identifier.eprints705en_NZ
dc.description.refereedNon Peer Revieweden_NZ
otago.school.eprintsTourismen_NZ
dc.description.referencesAukerman and Davison 1980 The Mountain Land Recreationist in New Zealand. Lincoln Papers in Resource Management, No. 6. Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute. Lincoln College, Canterbury. Catton W.R.J. 1969 Motivations of wilderness users. Woodlands Section, Pulp and Paper Magazine of Canada (19 December):121-126. Csikszentmiyalhi, M. 1975 Beyond Boredom and Anxiety San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Emerson, R. 1968 Games: Rules, Outcomes and Motivations. Mimeographed paper presented to AAAS Symposium on psychology and Sociology of Sport, Dallas, Texas. Decemebr 1968. Cited in Catton (1969). Ewert, A. 1985 Why people climb: The relationship of participant motives and experience level to mountaineering. Journal of Leisure Research 17(3):241-250. Ewert, A. 1989 Outdoor Adventure Pursuits: foundations, models and theories Publishing Horizons Inc. Columbus. Ewert A and S. Hollenhorst 1989 Testing the adventure model: Empirical support for a model of risk recreation participation. Journal of Leisure Research 21(2):124-139. Jebson, R.M. 1983 Administration of Commercial Recreation in the South Island Mountain Lands, unpublished MSc thesis. Christchurch: University of Canterbury. Johnston, M.E. 1989 Peak Experiences: Challenge and danger in mountain recreation in New Zealand, unpublished PhD thesis. Christchurch: Department of Geography, University of Canterbury. Kearsley, G.W. 1985 Wilderness images and national park management. In Imagery 1: Proceedings of the First International Imagery Conference, Queenstown, 1983. D.F. Marks and D.G. Russell, eds. Dunedin: Human Performance Associates. Langton, G. 1996 A History of Mountain Climbing in New Zealand to 1953, unpublished PhD thesis, Christchurch: History Department, University of Canterbury. Manning, R.E. 1986 Studies in Outdoor Recreation: A review and synthesis of the social science literature in outdoor recreation. Corvalis, OR: Oregon State University Press. Maslow, A. 1968 Toward a Psychology of Being, D. Van Nostrand Company Inc. Princeton, New Jersey, USA. McIntosh, A.J. and R.C. Prentice 1997 Conceptualising the experiences of heritage tourists. Tourism Management 18(2):75-87. Meier, J.F. 1980 Is the risk worth taking? In Leisure Today: Selected Readings. Volume Two. F.W.. Martin (editor), USA. Pearce and Booth 1987 New Zealand National Parks: Use and Users. New Zealand Geographer 43 (2) 66-72 Shultis, J.D. 1989 Image and use of New Zealand’s protected areas by domestic and international visitors. Geojournal 19 (3):329-335. Smith, J. Davison, J and Geden, B. 1980 The Public Mountain Land Resource for Recreation in New Zealand. Tussock Grasslands and Mountain Lands Institute. Lincoln College, Canterbury. Walle, A.H. 1997 Pursuing risk or insight marketing adventures. Annals of Tourism Research 24(2):265-282.en_NZ
otago.event.dates26-27 September 1997en_NZ
otago.event.placeDunedin, New Zealanden_NZ
otago.event.typeconferenceen_NZ
otago.event.titleQuality Tourism: Beyond the Masses, Proceedings of the First National Tourism Students’ Conferenceen_NZ
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