Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorJohnston, Andrew Ross
dc.contributor.authorChen, Samuel Alexander
dc.date.available2016-11-24T19:48:12Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationChen, S. A. (2016). Life on the edge: The survival of wildlife cinematography as a craft (Thesis, Master of Science Communication). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6973en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6973
dc.description.abstractOur natural world is under serious threat. Maintaining a connection between our ever-urbanising global population and our natural world is getting more and more difficult. Sometimes the only link between these two worlds is the mass media and, as a result, wildlife filmmaking has an important role to play. The very core of wildlife filmmaking is wildlife cinematography, yet the ‘craft of wildlife cinematography’ is under serious threat. Since the turn of the century, wildlife filmmakers report that they have found it difficult to survive in a very competitive film and television market. Filming wildlife in its natural environment takes time and has traditionally required a lot of specialist equipment. The high costs involved can make broadcasters less disposed to commissioning or buying such productions. According to industry insiders, this has resulted in less high quality behavioural wildlife footage being filmed. Does this mean that behavioural wildlife filmmaking needs to become more cost-effective if it is to survive? This thesis explores one possible answer to this problem by posing another question: Can the core cinematic approaches and techniques that define ‘quality’ wildlife cinematography be achieved by novice wildlife camera operators using limited equipment? Through an Industry Online Questionnaire, correspondence with world-leading wildlife cinematographers, and the identification of wildlife films judged to be of the highest quality, this thesis establishes criteria that can be used to establish what constitutes ‘quality’ wildlife cinematography. The creative component of the thesis, the film Kangaroo Island: Life on the Edge, challenged a novice wildlife cinematographer, the author, to achieve a cinematically ‘quality’ wildlife film shot using limited gear. That film was then evaluated by two experienced wildlife cinematographers to ascertain whether cinematic ‘quality’ had been met. The findings of the study reveal that it is possible to produce cinematically ‘quality’ behavioural wildlife films using limited gear – but with caveats – as limited gear can certainly impair cinematic ‘quality.’ The thesis then discusses the ramifications of this finding in a context where the technical requirements of the industry are constantly changing. There was one other important supplementary finding. Whatever the equipment used the cinematographer needs to understand the likely behaviour of the animals involved, in advance of the shoot, if he or she is to successfully record the desired animal behaviour.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectWildlife
dc.subjectcinemtography
dc.subjectkangaroo
dc.subjectisland
dc.subjectcamera
dc.subjectoperator
dc.subjectSamuel
dc.subjectChen
dc.subjectWalking
dc.subjectStory
dc.subjectrosenburg's
dc.subjectgoanna
dc.subjecthooded
dc.subjectplover
dc.subjectsouth
dc.subjectaustralia
dc.subjectanimal
dc.subjectbehaviour
dc.subjectfilming
dc.subjectlife
dc.subjecton
dc.subjectthe
dc.subjectedge
dc.subjectsurvival
dc.subjectwalking story
dc.subjectSouth Australia
dc.subjectKangaroo Island
dc.subjectwildlife cinematography
dc.subjectquality
dc.titleLife on the edge: The survival of wildlife cinematography as a craft
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-11-24T13:36:10Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineDepartment of Science Communication
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science Communication
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelMasters
otago.interloanno
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
 Find in your library

Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item is not available in full-text via OUR Archive.

If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record