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dc.contributor.advisorCollard, Judith
dc.contributor.advisorSeymour, Mark
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Joanne
dc.date.available2016-12-02T03:08:38Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, J. (2016). Fifty Years of Patronage: The Frances Hodgkins Fellowship and its Impact on Contemporary Art in New Zealand (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6996en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/6996
dc.description.abstractThe Frances Hodgkins Fellowship was the first artist-in-residence programme established in New Zealand. Over the past fifty years, the Fellowship has been awarded to some of New Zealand’s most highly regarded artists and in many cases it has had a considerable impact on their practice. The Fellowship is one of a trio of residencies established at the University of Otago by “anonymous donors” in the mid-twentieth century that support writers, artists and composers. The involvement of celebrated editor, poet and patron Charles Brasch in the establishment of the Fellowships has long been rumoured. In the absence of definitive proof, I have utilised his writings, both public and private, alongside documents pertaining to the establishment of the Fellowship to argue that he was the primary force behind the awards. Brasch was an ardent proponent of modernist New Zealand art in the mid-twentieth century and the Fellowship was clearly shaped by those ideals. When it was established there was minimal state support for the visual arts. Public galleries rarely exhibited the work of contemporary artists and dealer galleries were only beginning to appear in the larger centres. In this context, the Fellowship provided a rare and valuable opportunity for artists to focus on their practice free from perennial financial concerns. There has been very little research into the impact of residencies, on artists or the communities into which they are brought, in New Zealand or abroad. This study explores the history of the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship and highlights the significant impact it has had on individual recipients and the wider community. In addition to archival research, interviews have been conducted with former Fellows and those involved with the selection and administration of the Fellowship. The first part of the thesis focuses on its origins, the cultural context out of which it emerged and possible international precedents. The second chronologically discusses the impact of major developments in the arts and society on the Fellowship as well as the achievements of each of the Fellows' tenures. Although the Fellowship was originally intended to support only painters and sculptors, artists working in other media have been appointed in response to broadening definitions of art during the period.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectpatronage
dc.subjectfellowship
dc.subjectartist-in-residence
dc.subjectCharles Brasch
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectmodern art
dc.subjectcontemporary art
dc.subjectartists
dc.subjectarts funding
dc.subjectMichael Illingworth
dc.subjectTanya Ashken
dc.subjectDerek Ball
dc.subjectRalph Hotere
dc.subjectMichael Smither
dc.subjectMarte Szirmay
dc.subjectRay Thorburn
dc.subjectMarilynn Webb
dc.subjectJohn Parker
dc.subjectIan Bergquist
dc.subjectJeffrey Harris
dc.subjectGrahame Sydney
dc.subjectMatt Pine
dc.subjectAndrew Drummond
dc.subjectGretchen Albrecht
dc.subjectChris Booth
dc.subjectJoanna Margaret Paul
dc.subjectMichael Armstrong
dc.subjectDenis O'Connor
dc.subjectIan McMillan
dc.subjectKendal Heyes
dc.subjectJulia Morison
dc.subjectShona Rapira Davies
dc.subjectSiegfried Koglmeier
dc.subjectChristine Webster
dc.subjectNeil Frazer
dc.subjectPeter Gibson Smith
dc.subjectNicola Jackson
dc.subjectJeff Thomson
dc.subjectFiona Pardington
dc.subjectShane Cotton
dc.subjectSeraphine Pick
dc.subjectJim Speers
dc.subjectAva Seymour
dc.subjectScott Eady
dc.subjectSara Hughes
dc.subjectMladen Bizumic
dc.subjectRohan Wealleans
dc.subjectSarah Munro
dc.subjectBen Cauchi
dc.subjectHeather Straka
dc.subjectEddie Clemens
dc.subjectJoanna Langford
dc.subjectKushana Bush
dc.subjectNick Austin
dc.subjectZina Swanson
dc.subjectPatrick Lundberg
dc.subjectRodney Kennedy
dc.subjectEsmond de Beer
dc.subjectGlobe Theatre
dc.subjectLandfall
dc.subjectphilanthropy
dc.subjectDunedin
dc.subjectarts residency programmes
dc.subjectGregory Fellows
dc.subjectFrances Hodgkins Fellowship
dc.titleFifty Years of Patronage: The Frances Hodgkins Fellowship and its Impact on Contemporary Art in New Zealand
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2016-12-01T22:56:44Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory and Art History
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.interloanyes
otago.openaccessAbstract Only
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