Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Lloyd Spencer
dc.contributor.authorSzymanski, Erika Amethyst
dc.date.available2017-02-14T19:49:26Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationSzymanski, E. A. (2017). Through the grapevine: In search of a rhetoric of industry-oriented science communication (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7088en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7088
dc.description.abstractRhetorical features of industry-oriented science communication texts structure meetings between science and industry communities and, consequently, structure research industry relationships. Industry-oriented science communication, however, remains dominated by metaphors of technology transfer and research utilization which continue to enact deficit model paradigms by drawing on essentially positivist constructions of scientific knowledge. In so doing, these models limit the capacity for science communication texts to make research relevant to industry practice and to facilitate research-industry collaboration as multidirectional knowledge sharing. Better metaphors for more relevant and more collaborative communication can, I argue, be found in material semiotic paradigms which would have science communicators align and overlap the multiply practiced worlds of science and industry instead of transferring acontextual, would-be universal knowledge to deeply emplaced sites of utilization. In interviews with and surveys of winemakers and growers in Washington State and New Zealand, I find that technology transfer paradigms configure wine industry members' interactions with research in ways which systematically eliminate moments in which this public participates in scientific processes. Winemakers and growers generally value and seek out scientific information, but also tend to perceive scientific and industry knowledge as complementary, with industry knowledge having the epistemic authority to judge new scientific findings. Textual analyses of research dissemination in these two settings outline science communication texts which limit valid knowledge to scientific knowledge alone, manifestly ignoring industry knowledge and the context-dependency of knowledge-making practices for industry use. These texts construct research practices as above and distant from the world of winemaker and grower practices rather than making scientific and industry practices adjacent and proximal. Material semiotic paradigms would in contrast have science communicators align and overlap the multiply practiced worlds of science and industry. Instead of transferring acontextual knowledge to sites of utilization, science communication would make it possible for industry readers to locate scientific knowledge practices with respect to their own practices, making science relevant to industry by drawing relationships amongst them. A collaborative rhetoric of industry-oriented science communication would, therefore, communicate scientific research as locatable practice in the context of its generation, recognizing the meaning-making practices of industry audiences and their potential contribution to the iterative process of creating applied scientific claims valid in both scientific and industry spaces.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectscience communication
dc.subjectrhetoric of science
dc.subjectscience and technology studies
dc.subjectwine
dc.subjectNew Zealand
dc.subjectWashington State
dc.titleThrough the grapevine: In search of a rhetoric of industry-oriented science communication
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-02-14T12:52:56Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineCentre for Science Communication
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
 Find in your library

Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record