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dc.contributor.advisorClements, Kevin
dc.contributor.advisorLee, SungYong
dc.contributor.authorShibata, Ria
dc.date.available2017-04-11T01:26:30Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.identifier.citationShibata, R. (2017). War, Identity, and Inherited Responsibility in Sino-Japanese Relations (Thesis, Doctor of Philosophy). University of Otago. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10523/7286en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10523/7286
dc.description.abstractGroups in conflict develop different and often contesting interpretations of the past, particularly if that history involves a violent injustice. How both perpetrator and victimised groups deal with their past history is critical to the successful resolution of protracted conflicts. When the harm is left unacknowledged and unaddressed, feelings of victimisation, humiliation, and shame emerge and frequently prolong the conflict between the transgressor and transgressed. The perpetrator's acknowledgment of responsibility for immoral acts is therefore an essential pre-requisite in promoting reconciliation. Debates about historical injustices, however, focus on whether guilt and responsibility for past wrongs should be passed on from the original perpetrators to the generational descendants. Seventy years have passed since the end of the Second World War, and yet the memories of the war continue to negatively affect the relations between China and Japan. While Chinese victims and their descendants continue to seek apology and closure, the Japanese public are experiencing 'apology fatigue'—a feeling of frustration that no matter what they do, the victims will never be satisfied. This thesis seeks to examine the extent to which present-day Japanese are willing to accept some degree of inherited responsibility for the acts of aggression committed by their ancestors. Drawing on social identity, basic human needs and reconciliation theories, this research aims to identify the social psychological factors impeding Japanese acceptance of collective responsibility for its past. Using a mixed methods approach, this problem is examined and explored with a sample of 162 Japanese university students representing a generation who were never directly involved in the nation's misdeeds.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherUniversity of Otago
dc.rightsAll items in OUR Archive are provided for private study and research purposes and are protected by copyright with all rights reserved unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subjectcollective guilt
dc.subjecthistorical injustices
dc.subjectSino-Japanese relations
dc.subjectcollective memory
dc.subjectapology
dc.subjectapology fatigue
dc.subjectidentity
dc.subjectsocial identity theory
dc.subjectvictimhood
dc.subjectEast Asia reconciliation
dc.subjectEast Asia peace
dc.titleWar, Identity, and Inherited Responsibility in Sino-Japanese Relations
dc.typeThesis
dc.date.updated2017-04-10T21:18:04Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
thesis.degree.disciplineNational Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Otago
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral
otago.openaccessOpen
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